Author Interviews

2:52pm

Sun September 2, 2012
Author Interviews

The Writer Who Was The Voice Of A Generation

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 4:57 pm

After struggling with depression for much of his adult life, writer David Foster Wallace committed suicide on Sept. 12, 2008.
Giovanni Giovannetti Effigie

When writer David Foster Wallace committed suicide in 2008 at the age of 46, U.S. literature lost one of its most influential living writers.

The definitive account of Wallace's life and what led to his suicide was published in the New Yorker in March of the following year.

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6:22am

Sun September 2, 2012
Author Interviews

Behind The Lens With Obama's 'First Cameraman'

Originally published on Sun September 2, 2012 4:24 am

Before joining candidate Obama's new media team in 2008, Arun Chaudhary worked in film in New York and was on the faculty of NYU's graduate film school.
Susan Walsh AP

Many presidents have had official White House photographers, but Arun Chaudhary claims the honor of being the first official White House videographer. He has written a book about his journey from disheveled film professor to his four years in the almost constant company of the president. First Cameraman is an often funny, generally admiring account of the life and times of candidate Barack Obama — and then President Obama — and the sleepless nights and adventure-filled days of the man trying to record it all.

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2:44pm

Sat September 1, 2012
Author Interviews

Following The Footnotes Of The Revolutionary War

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 4:37 pm

In his book, Robert Sullivan considers, among other things, how little Emanuel Leutze's 1851 painting Washington Crossing the Delaware has in common with the actual historic crossing, which took place at night and during a snowstorm.
Metropolitan Museum of Art AP

When we think of the seminal moments in the birth of the United States of America, many people would point to the battles of Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill. But according to Robert Sullivan, the founding landscape of our nation is not in Massachusetts. It is in and around New York.

In his new book, My American Revolution: Crossing the Delaware and I-78, Sullivan writes that the majority of battles in the Revolutionary War were fought in the middle colonies: New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania.

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1:24am

Fri August 31, 2012
Author Interviews

Against The Odds, A 'Miracle Boy Grows Up'

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 10:48 am

Ben Mattlin has defied expectations for his entire life — starting with being alive at all. Mattlin has a condition called spinal muscular atrophy, and many infants born with it don't live past age 2. But Mattlin grew up to be one of the first students using a wheelchair to attend Harvard. He married, had a family and is now the author of a new memoir, Miracle Boy Grows Up: How the Disability Rights Revolution Saved My Sanity.

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12:44pm

Sun August 26, 2012
Author Interviews

'A Contest Of Wits': A Former Forger Recalls His Art

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 8:11 am

After John F. Herring by Ken Perenyi, circa 1989.
Courtesy of Pegasus Books

Next time you're admiring a 19th century American master painting at a museum or auction house, take a closer look. What looks like an authentic creation complete with cracks and yellowing varnish could actually be the work of forger Ken Perenyi.

Perenyi made millions of dollars over 30 years with more than 1,000 forgeries, allowing him to jet set around the world. His highest earning work was a Martin Johnson Heade forgery that sold for more than $700,000.

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