Author Interviews

1:37am

Mon April 30, 2012
Author Interviews

Caro's 'Passage of Power': LBJ's Political Genius

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 8:26 am

Keystone Getty Images

Robert Caro writes obsessively about power. Fittingly, it's Lyndon Johnson — catapulted suddenly into the presidency "in the crack of a gunshot" — who consumes him.

The Passage of Power, the fourth volume of Caro's massive biography of Lyndon Johnson, is released this week. Caro has dedicated decades to meticulously researching Johnson's life, and the previous books in the series have been almost universally hailed as a significant achievement in American letters.

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4:32am

Sun April 29, 2012
Author Interviews

'Hot Dog' Meets 'Bun': Famous Food Discoveries

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 10:31 am

iStockPhoto.com

If you're watching a sports game at home, at a bar or at an arena, what better way to enjoy it than with some nachos, pretzels or hot dogs?

As a former baseball player, Josh Chetwynd knows a thing or two about stadium grub. His new book, How the Hot Dog Found Its Bun: Accidental Discoveries and Unexpected Inspirations That Shape What We Eat and Drink, features 75 short essays that trace the history of popular food and dispel common misconceptions.

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5:50am

Sat April 28, 2012
NPR Story

'What Good' Does Congress Do? Don't Ask

Originally published on Sat April 28, 2012 10:22 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The U.S. Congress doesn't win any popularity contests. Approval ratings for the legislative branch run the gamut from dismal to embarrassing. Nine percent at their lowest, and all the chaos and discord in the 112th Congress have distressed a lot of its members too. Democratic representative Emanuel Cleaver of Missouri called the last-minute deal to raise the debt ceiling, quote, "a sugar-coated Satan sandwich. If you lift the bun, you will not like what you see."

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4:04am

Sat April 28, 2012
Author Interviews

'The Art Of The Sale': Life's A Pitch

Originally published on Sat April 28, 2012 10:22 am

iStockphoto

Salesmen are rarely heroic figures in American culture. They're often shown as slick, unscrupulous charlatans like Ricky Roma in David Mamet's play Glengarry Glen Ross. And then there are sad, defeated characters like Willy Loman in Death Of A Salesman, who shortly before taking his life says, "After all the highways, and the trains, and the appointments, and the years, you end up worth more dead than alive."

Yet sales drive the economy. The cleverest invention or product will disappear — creating no income, no employment — unless someone can sell it.

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1:27am

Tue April 24, 2012
Author Interviews

A Rival For Pigeon In Willems' New 'Duckling'

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 11:51 am

Author Mo Willems says the character of Pigeon first appeared in the margins of other projects, and demanded to be written about.
Marty Umans

For a certain set of readers, one need only say the word "pigeon" to set off a frenzied outburst of delight. Pigeon is the star of a series of best-selling children's books, including The Pigeon Finds a Hotdog! and Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! He's not much more than a stick figure with two circles for eyes, but he can still get huffy and display all the melodrama of a 4-year-old.

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