Books

5:47am

Tue July 15, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Pakistani Civil Servant Who Published Debut Novel At 79 Dies

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 6:40 am

Novelist Jamil Ahmad. His wife, Helga, is in the background.
Jim Wildman NPR

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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12:12pm

Mon July 14, 2014
The Two-Way

With Bright Benches, London Shows Off Its Love Of Books

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 11:36 am

Jane Headford designed this Dr. Seuss bench, which is spending the summer alongside the River Thames
Courtesy of The National Literacy Trust

Chicago had cows, St. Louis has cakes and now London has benches that look like opened books.

The National Literacy Trust, along with public art promoter Wild in Art, has commissioned and placed 50 benches around town that are painted to look like pages and scenes from famous books.

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9:57am

Mon July 14, 2014
The Two-Way

Nadine Gordimer, Nobel-Winning Chronicler Of Apartheid, Dies

Gordimer, shown here in 2006, died in her sleep Sunday at home in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Guillermo Arias AP

Nadine Gordimer, a Nobel Prize-winning author famed for her portrayals of South Africa under apartheid, died Sunday, her family said in a statement. She was 90.

Gordimer was considered a modern literary genius, an important chronicler of the injustices of racial segregation along with other white writers such as Athol Fugard and J.M. Coetzee.

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6:03am

Mon July 14, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Famed Philosopher Accused Of Plagiarizing White Separatist Journal

Marxist philosopher Slavoj Zizek, photographed in 2012 in London.
Tim Whitby Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Marxist philosopher Slavoj Žižek — who is one of the world's most prominent living public intellectuals — has been accused of plagiarizing from the white separatist magazine American Renaissance. (The magazine calls itself a "race realist" publication, while the Southern Poverty Law Center calls it a hub for "proponents of eugenics and blatant anti-black racists.")

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2:54pm

Fri July 11, 2014
This Week's Must Read

In Aftermath Of Brazil's World Cup Defeat, A Poem To Numb The Pain

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 6:21 pm

Any time you're facing big failure is a good time to revisit the 1888 poem "Casey at the Bat." It's the classic story of dashed optimism, of an entire city putting its hopes on the result of one single, heartbreaking at-bat. Here are the last stanzas. It's down to the wire. The Mudville team has two outs, two strikes, and they're hoping Casey will save them.

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