Books

2:50pm

Wed May 8, 2013
Books

Fitzgerald Might Disagree With His 'No Second Acts' Line

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 3:55 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You've likely seen or heard a news story in recent years that began something like this: F. Scott Fitzgerald once wrote, there are no second acts in American lives. But Fitzgerald clearly never met - fill in the blank.

It seems a whole generation of American politicians has fallen from grace only to rise again and disprove the line: Bill Clinton, Newt Gingrich, Eliot Spitzer. And just last night, South Carolina's newest congressman, Mark Sanford.

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6:23am

Wed May 8, 2013
Author Interviews

With Gorgeous Dorms But Little Cash, Colleges Must Adapt

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 9:43 am

Many high school seniors who are heading to college this fall have just paid their tuition deposits — the first real taste of what the college experience is going to cost them. These students are heading to school at a time that some consider a transformative moment for American colleges and universities. Costs are skyrocketing, and there are some real questions about what value college students are getting for their money.

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5:56am

Wed May 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Translators Of Dan Brown Novel Toiled In 'Bunker'

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 6:22 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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5:25am

Tue May 7, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Freud's Couch Succumbs To Despair, Ennui

The famous couch used by psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud was on display at his former home in London in 1986.
Anne Purkiss AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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2:22pm

Mon May 6, 2013
Book Reviews

Safety Is Relative: A Moving Account Of Life In Chechnya

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 7:00 pm

Russian troops patrol Minutka square in the Chechen capital on Monday, Feb. 28, 2000.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

How do you write an absorbing novel about unspeakable things? It's always a tricky business, and an editor I know once described the dilemma this way: "A reader needs to want to go there." What "there" means is the self-contained world of the book. And what would make a reader want to go deeply into a world of hopelessness and seemingly perpetual war, a world of torture and intimidation and exploding land mines? There are many answers. One of the most obvious, of course, is the language.

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