Books

4:38pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Author Interviews

Novel Examines Afghanistan War From A Pakistani Perspective

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:43 am

The sun sets just east of Chaman, Pakistan, near the Afghan border, on Nov. 8, 2001.
Laura Rauch AP

Two young men — foster brothers in love with the same woman — leave their small Pakistani town for Afghanistan in late 2001. Jeo, a medical student, wants to help wounded civilians and Mikal is there to look after Jeo, but their good intentions aren't enough to keep them safe in an increasingly dangerous war zone.

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7:00am

Tue May 28, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Not Everyone's A Fan Of Amazon's Fan Fiction Move

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 7:57 am

Seattle-based Amazon announced last week that it will begin selling fan fiction. CEO Jeff Bezos speaks at a 2009 event.
Mario Tama Getty Images

5:59am

Tue May 28, 2013
Author Interviews

'The Son': A Texas Saga With Guilt And Gore To Go Around

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 8:16 am

The American West has always been fertile ground for writers. Now Philipp Meyer steps into that territory with his new novel The Son. It's a family saga that traces the settling of Texas from its days as a wild frontier to the oil boom — with no shortage of violence.

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2:28pm

Mon May 27, 2013
Food

Gathering Around The 'Global Grill'

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 3:36 pm

Bon Appetit editor Adam Rapoport compiled recipes from all over the world for The Grilling Book. Pictured here are Chicken Yakitori.
Courtesy of Peden + Munk

Grilling is a pillar of the American summer and the world's oldest form of cooking. From Latin America to Africa, grilling is at the heart of many cultures. This summer All Things Considered is setting out to explore some of them with the "Global Grill" series.

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1:57pm

Sun May 26, 2013
Author Interviews

From A 'Death' To A Crisis, Tracing China's Bo Xilai Scandal

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 3:25 pm

Chongqing Municipality Communist Party Secretary Bo Xilai attends the opening ceremony of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference at the Great Hall of the People on March 3, 2012, in Beijing, China.
Feng Li Getty Images

On Feb. 7, 2012, Wang Lijun, a former Chinese police chief, showed up at the American Consulate in Chengdu, China. He said his life was in danger, asked for asylum and said he had information implicating Bo Xilai, an important member of the Chinese political elite, in the murder of a British citizen.

The incident set off an international media deluge, and the ensuing scandal sent ripples throughout the ruling Communist Party that are still being felt.

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