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Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

Boulder County will resume issuing oil and gas drilling permits May 1, 2017, after a series of moratoriums halted the practice in 2012. Denver- based energy company Crestone Peak Resources has filed the first application in five years to drill within unincorporated parts of the county. The company is the fifth largest producer in the Denver-Julesburg basin – an oil and gas-rich formation situated under much of Northeastern Colorado and portions of Boulder County.

Grace Hood / KUNC

In September 2013 torrential rain caused a swollen Big Thompson River to tear away -- and in some places completely destroy -- parts of U.S. Highway 34.

Temporary repairs reopened the road by December, but permanent repairs didn’t start until October 2016. 

Since then, hundreds of tons of rock have been blasted from the canyon walls, prompting the closure of a three mile stretch of the canyon. The road will reopen in late May 2017.

City of Greeley

Weld County was the fourth fastest growing metro area in the nation between 2015 and 2016 according to new data from the U.S. Census bureau. The ranks are based on percentage change, rather than the number of people that the population grew by. For Weld, the population grew by 3.5 percent -- to a total of 294,932 people.

Courtesy: Brewers Association

Colorado remains well-represented among the nation’s top craft breweries.

A new ranking from the Boulder-based Brewers Association places five of Colorado’s breweries among the top 50 in the country for 2016. The ranking is based on a brewery’s total sales volume for the year.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

President Donald Trump has nominated former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as Agriculture Secretary, bucking a recent trend of Midwest leadership at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and making many in the farm country of the Midwest and Great Plans a little leery.

Coupled with the appointments of leaders from Oklahoma and Texas to head the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy, respectively, there looks to be a shift in the power center of the parts of the federal government that most directly impact agriculture.

https://press.atairbnb.com/media-assets/ / Air Bnb

Home sharing services have become very popular in Colorado, and local municipalities are paying attention. Between Feb. 20 – 24, more than 1,000 notices were mailed to Denver hosts for being in violation of a city ordinance. The ordinance, passed last June, require hosts to have short-term rental licenses and collect Denver’s 10.75 percent lodging tax.

Once hosts obtain a license, they must post it on their listing in order to avoid any fines. The license fee is $25, and the fines for failing to obtain a license can range from $150 to nearly $1,000.

In Bid To Cut Food Waste, Expiration Labels Get An Update

Feb 16, 2017
File: Brian Seifferlein/Harvest Public Media

It’s a classic conundrum that comes up every time you’re cleaning out the fridge: the package label says the food is past its prime, but it’s not moldy or smelly.

Do you give it a chance or toss it in the trash?

For a great number of consumers it’s the latter, but now some of the largest food retail trade groups are hoping to settle the score and clear up the confusion in hopes of keeping more food in bellies, rather than sending heaps of food to landfills.

Jim Hill / KUNC

Colorado is currently the seventh fastest growing state in the nation. Experts expect the bullseye of future growth to be the northern Front Range.

“We’re forecasting the state to increase between 2010 and 2040 by about 2.8 million people — about 500,000 in the north Front Range, in Larimer and Weld counties,” said state demographer Elizabeth Garner.

It all has to do with jobs -- sort of. Data show that in the past 10 years many people are moving from the Western Slope to the northern Front Range looking for work, while high-paying tech industry jobs has brought workers in from other states. It’s the marriage of these two counties and what they have to offer commuters that makes them so economically diverse.

Courtesy Okanagan Specialty Fruits

Genetically engineered crops are nothing new. But new technology that allows scientists to alter plants more precisely and more cheaply is taking genetically engineered plants from the field to the kitchen.

The first version of the Arctic Apple, a genetically modified Golden Delicious, is headed for test markets in the Midwest in February, according to the company that produced it. It is the first genetically engineered apple, altered so that when it is cut, it doesn’t turn brown from oxidation.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

A war is brewing over what you pour on your breakfast cereal.

Dairy farmers say the makers of plant-based milks – like almond milk, soy milk and a long list of other varieties – are stealing away their customers and deceiving consumers. And they’d like the federal government to back them up.

At its heart, the fight boils down to the definition and use of one simple word: milk.

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