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https://press.atairbnb.com/media-assets/ / Air Bnb

Home sharing services have become very popular in Colorado, and local municipalities are paying attention. Between Feb. 20 – 24, more than 1,000 notices were mailed to Denver hosts for being in violation of a city ordinance. The ordinance, passed last June, require hosts to have short-term rental licenses and collect Denver’s 10.75 percent lodging tax.

Once hosts obtain a license, they must post it on their listing in order to avoid any fines. The license fee is $25, and the fines for failing to obtain a license can range from $150 to nearly $1,000.

In Bid To Cut Food Waste, Expiration Labels Get An Update

Feb 16, 2017
File: Brian Seifferlein/Harvest Public Media

It’s a classic conundrum that comes up every time you’re cleaning out the fridge: the package label says the food is past its prime, but it’s not moldy or smelly.

Do you give it a chance or toss it in the trash?

For a great number of consumers it’s the latter, but now some of the largest food retail trade groups are hoping to settle the score and clear up the confusion in hopes of keeping more food in bellies, rather than sending heaps of food to landfills.

Jim Hill / KUNC

Colorado is currently the seventh fastest growing state in the nation. Experts expect the bullseye of future growth to be the northern Front Range.

“We’re forecasting the state to increase between 2010 and 2040 by about 2.8 million people — about 500,000 in the north Front Range, in Larimer and Weld counties,” said state demographer Elizabeth Garner.

It all has to do with jobs -- sort of. Data show that in the past 10 years many people are moving from the Western Slope to the northern Front Range looking for work, while high-paying tech industry jobs has brought workers in from other states. It’s the marriage of these two counties and what they have to offer commuters that makes them so economically diverse.

Courtesy Okanagan Specialty Fruits

Genetically engineered crops are nothing new. But new technology that allows scientists to alter plants more precisely and more cheaply is taking genetically engineered plants from the field to the kitchen.

The first version of the Arctic Apple, a genetically modified Golden Delicious, is headed for test markets in the Midwest in February, according to the company that produced it. It is the first genetically engineered apple, altered so that when it is cut, it doesn’t turn brown from oxidation.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

A war is brewing over what you pour on your breakfast cereal.

Dairy farmers say the makers of plant-based milks – like almond milk, soy milk and a long list of other varieties – are stealing away their customers and deceiving consumers. And they’d like the federal government to back them up.

At its heart, the fight boils down to the definition and use of one simple word: milk.

Why We're Growing The Most Sweet Potatoes Since WWII

Jan 25, 2017
USDA / Flickr

Sweet potatoes are undergoing a modern renaissance in this country.

While they have always made special appearances on many American tables around the holidays, year-round demand for the root vegetables has grown. In 2015, farmers produced more sweet potatoes than in any year since World War II.

Trent Bona Photography

Colorado’s 10th Special Forces Group based in Fort Carson has tapped a Colorado company to fit its soldiers with special skis.

Romp Skis, based out of Crested Butte, is  co-owned by two brothers, Caleb and Morgan Weinberg. They specialize in custom skis. But the ski they’ve designed for the soldiers is more of a tool than a toy.

Caleb Weinberg says the military had some very specific requirements to accommodate soldiers: Each soldier can weigh more than 200 pounds on their own and they carry 75-pound backpacks.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Controversial federal rules that would change the production of organic meat may not be finalized before President Barack Obama leaves office, leaving open the possibility that they may never go into effect.

The proposed rules -- currently awaiting White House review -- would create new standards and clarify other regulations regarding how livestock are treated on certified organic farms.

In an effort to tighten animal welfare guidelines for organic producers, these rules mostly focus on livestock and poultry living conditions, veterinary health care practices on farms, and handling, transport and slaughter of livestock.

Fred Knapp / Harvest Public Media

A proposal that would jumpstart the chicken business in Nebraska has some residents concerned about the potential impact on the environment and are trying to block or delay its construction.

Costco, the warehouse retailer and grocery chain, plans to build a giant $300 million chicken slaughterhouse on the south side of the town of Fremont in eastern Nebraska.

To make sure the plant is humming year-round, Costco wants new farms around Fremont to raise 17 million chickens every year. As of the 2012 Census of Agriculture, there were less than 1 million broilers - chickens raised for meat - in the whole state.

University of Colorado, Boulder Leeds School of Business

Richard Wobbekind has seen decades of change in Colorado, from huge population booms to agricultural busts. As lead economist on the annual Leeds School of Business economic forecast, he and his team pour over data and statistical models to try and suss out how the state’s economy may change in the New Year.

The comprehensive report covers everything from housing costs to molybdenum mining (Colorado is the top producer in the country), but here is what you need to know for 2017.

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