Business

1:42am

Wed March 6, 2013
Series: Working Late

For Midwife, 71, Delivering Babies Never Gets Old

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 12:30 pm

Colorado midwife Dian Sparling, 71, meets with Lisa Eldridge and her baby, Colton James.
John W. Poole NPR

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

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4:36pm

Tue March 5, 2013
Planet Money

Episode 441: Business Secrets Of The Amish

Robert Smith / NPR

Higher land prices have forced Amish off the farms and into business. There are thousands of Amish run firms out there making everything from plumbing supplies to furniture.

But running an Amish business poses unique challenges. Many Amish don't connect to the electrical grid. They don't drive cars. They prize modesty, meaning traditional advertising slogans like "best," "fastest," and "greatest" are out. An Amish company has to be creative about these things.

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4:17pm

Tue March 5, 2013
Business

As Construction Picks Up, American Truck Makers Race

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 5:34 pm

Ford unveils the F-150 Atlas concept pickup during January's North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Experts say the boom in construction will boost pickup sales.
Carlos Osorio AP

Economists look at many tea leaves as they try to determine the health of the economy. One of the most important surrounds vehicle sales, and more specifically pickup truck sales, which are tied to the construction industry. And as last month's sales rose 18 percent, the auto industry is betting big on a real estate rebound.

It's arguable that the Ford F-150 is the most important vehicle to come out of Detroit since the Model-T. It's also built where many parts for the old Model-T were made in Dearborn, Mich.

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1:20pm

Tue March 5, 2013
Around the Nation

Sequestered Spring Means Fewer Rangers, Services At National Parks

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 9:49 am

Hikers walk on the Mist Trail to Vernal Fall at Yosemite National Park in California. The National Park Service has to cut $134 million from sites around the country, including Yosemite, due to the lack of a budget deal in Congress.
Gosia Wozniacka AP

Spring has come early to the Yosemite Valley, and the melting snow makes for a spectacular rush of water off the granite face of Yosemite Falls, the tallest in North America.

Early March is when park officials would normally be gearing up for the busy tourist season. Instead, they're figuring out how to cut $1.5 million from their budget. Without a budget deal, the sequestration has forced the Park Service to cut a total of $134 million from sites around the country.

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12:57pm

Tue March 5, 2013
The Two-Way

White House Backs Right To Unlock New Cell Phones

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 1:23 pm

Following the lead of FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, the White House said yesterday that it believed users should be allowed to unlock their cellphones without breaking the law.

The White House made the statement in response to an online petition signed by more than 114,000 people. R. David Edelman wrote:

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