Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

12:16pm

Fri July 26, 2013
Shots - Health News

Cyclo-What? A Nasty Stomach Bug Spreads In The Midwest

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 9:45 am

Cyclospora is a tough parasite that can survive for weeks outside the human body.
CDC

It seems like the Midwest is a hotbed for medical mysteries these days.

Earlier this week, scientists traced a brand-new virus to ticks in Missouri. Now disease detectives are hot on the trail of another puzzling pathogen in the heartland.

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4:19pm

Thu July 25, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Mosquitoes Love Me, And Other Mysteries Revealed

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 11:44 am

The mosquitoes that feed on people are attracted to over 300 gases and other compounds emitted by human skin.
CDC Public Health Image Library

Come summertime, some of us here at Shots are reminded, as we lounge on decks and venture into overgrown gardens, that we are irresistible to mosquitoes. As we gripe about our itchy, pocked limbs, we can't help but wonder just why they unfailingly devour us and pass over our friends and loved ones. And when it comes to repellent, it's hard to tell just what works best.

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8:45am

Tue July 23, 2013
Shots - Health News

Unusual Tick-Borne Virus Lurks In Missouri's Woods

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 8:11 am

A harmful trio (from left): a deer tick, lone star tick and dog tick.
Getty Images

Last year, scientists got the chance to solve a medical mystery — well, at least half of it. This week the final puzzle pieces fell into place, as investigators tracked the newly identified virus to an eight-legged bug.

The mystery actually began with two Missouri farmers who came down with a strange illness in 2009. They had high fevers, diarrhea and nausea. Their platelet counts dropped dramatically, though they didn't experience any abnormal bleeding.

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9:07am

Wed July 17, 2013
Shots - Health News

A Warm Winter Helped Fuel West Nile Outbreak In Dallas

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 8:43 am

A sprayer truck blankets a neighborhood in North Dallas with insecticide to curb mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus in July 2012.
Tom Fox/Dallas Morning News Corbis

West Nile virus looked like it was waning as a health threat, with the number of cases dropping each year. Then last summer, it roared back.

The number of people infected with the mosquito-borne illness suddenly spiked in 2012. And Dallas was hit hardest of all.

People showed up in emergency rooms with encephalitis and paralysis, unable to breathe on their own.

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12:38pm

Thu July 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

For Youths, Fewer Homicides But Still Many Deaths

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 7:14 am

Homicide remains a leading cause of death for young people, even as rates drop. In Chicago, a teenage boy grieves next to a memorial where Ashley Hardmon, 19, was shot and killed on July 2. Gunmen fired while she was chatting with friends.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Homicide rates among teenagers and young adults have dropped to the lowest level in 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That's good news, but it still means about 4,800 young people under age 25 were murdered in 2010.

Teenagers and young adults remain more likely to be killed than older adults, and homicide is a leading cause of death in the young, behind motor vehicle accidents.

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