China

11:13am

Wed September 11, 2013
World

Chinese Premier Says Foreign Companies To Get 'Equal Treatment'

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 1:25 pm

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) listens to Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong during a meeting last month.
How Hwee Young AP

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang has pledged to treat foreign multinational companies on a par with the country's own state-owned enterprises, but he warned that an economic rebound remains fragile.

Li, speaking at a business forum in the northeastern city of Dalian on Wednesday, cautioned that the global economic outlook was a "complex situation" and outlined a series of steps designed to keep the country on a moderate but sustainable growth path.

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2:50pm

Tue September 10, 2013
World

Beijing To Crack Down On Social Media 'Slanderous Rumors'

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 6:15 pm

An Internet cafe in Beijing photographed last year.
Greg Baker dapd

China will jail anyone caught using social media to spread "slanderous rumors" or "false information" for up to 10 years, according to a new legal interpretation of Internet restrictions, the official Xinhua news agency reports.

A court's interpretation says the spread of such rumors could automatically incur a three-year prison term, but if the post is read by 5,000 or more people and/or shared more than 500 times, the penalty could jump to 10 years in jail.

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1:30am

Mon September 9, 2013
All Tech Considered

It's OK To Protest In China, Just Don't March

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 11:12 am

Security guards stand outside newspaper offices in Guangdong province in January, where banners and flowers were laid in protest of censorship.
AP

Thousands of messages posted on the Internet every day in China get censored. Until now, little has been known about how the Chinese censorship machine works — except that it is comprehensive.

"It probably is the largest effort ever to selectively censor human expression," says Harvard University social scientist Gary King. "They don't censor everything. There are millions of Chinese [who] talk about millions of things. But the effort to prune the Internet of certain kinds of information is unprecedented."

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4:41pm

Thu September 5, 2013
The Salt

Was Your Chicken Nugget Made In China? It'll Soon Be Hard To Know

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 10:52 am

iStockphoto.com

Here's a bit of news that might make you drop that chicken nugget midbite.

Just before the start of the long holiday weekend last Friday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture quietly announced that it was ending a ban on processed chicken imports from China. The kicker: These products can now be sold in the U.S. without a country-of-origin label.

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4:10pm

Tue September 3, 2013
World

5 Years After Being Covered With Water, Chinese Village Emerges

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 4:11 pm

A July photo shows houses that have emerged from Tangjiashan Barrier Lake in Xuanping Township, in southwest China's Sichuan Province.
Liu Huawei Xinhua /Landov

It's been a long time since the people who lived in rural Xuanping saw their little town, which was flooded by a powerful earthquake in 2008. But thanks to a steep drop in water levels, parts of their village in China's Sichuan Province are visible again, from homes and businesses to its school.

The village's ghostly return began in July, when water levels fell from 712 meters to 703 meters above sea level — a difference of nearly 30 feet, as news site China Daily Asia reported.

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