Civil Rights

1:04am

Fri June 13, 2014
StoryCorps

Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: 'It Was A Milestone'

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 11:14 am

In June 1964, James Brock dumped acid into the water at the Monson Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Fla. He was trying to disrupt swimmers who were protesting the hotel's whites-only policy.
Bettmann Corbis

On June 18, 1964, black and white protesters jumped into the whites-only pool at the Monson Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Fla. In an attempt to force them out, the owner of the hotel poured acid into the pool.

Martin Luther King Jr. had planned the sit-in during the St. Augustine Movement, a part of the larger civil rights movement. The protest — and the owner's acidic response — is largely forgotten today, but it played a role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act, now celebrating its 50th anniversary.

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6:22am

Fri April 4, 2014
Code Switch

Sit Next To Rosa Parks At The National Civil Rights Museum

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:13 am

The Montgomery Bus Boycott exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum features a vintage city bus. Visitors can go inside the bus and sit next to a figure of Rosa Parks.
Christopher Blank WKNO

In 1991, the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., became America's first major museum to paint a broad picture of the civil rights movement. Its content hasn't changed much since then. But this Saturday after a nearly $28 million renovation that took 18 months, the museum will reopen with a new design that aims to appeal to an older generation as well as a post-civil-rights-era audience.

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5:30am

Mon January 20, 2014
Community

Martin Luther King Jr. Celebrations Planned Along The Front Range

Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, Aug. 24, 2011, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
Credit Tom LeGro / PBS NewsHour

On Monday, January 20, 1986, people across the country celebrated the first official Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the only federal holiday commemorating an African-American. In Colorado, many will commemorate the life and legacy of the slain civil-rights leader across the Front Range.

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4:39pm

Wed August 28, 2013
The NPR 100

The Inspiring Force Of 'We Shall Overcome'

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 7:26 pm

American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger (left) adopted and helped popularize "We Shall Overcome" by teaching the song at rallies and protests. Here he sings with activists in Greenwood, Miss., in 1963.
Adger Cowans Getty Images

As the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, All Things Considered concludes its series about the moments that defined the historic summer of 1963. Back in 1999, Noah Adams explored the history and legacy of the song "We Shall Overcome" for the NPR 100. The audio link contains a condensed version of that piece.

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4:37pm

Wed August 28, 2013
Arts & Life

50 Years Later: Sounds And Voices From The March

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 7:35 am

Margaret Pearson, 71, immigrated from the U.K. two months after the '63 March in Washington. She joined the crowd today.
Tanya Ballard Brown NPR

It was a cloudy and rainy day in Washington on Wednesday. But that did not keep thousands from descending on the National Mall to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

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