Climate Change

2:01am

Tue September 24, 2013
Environment

How Many Scientists Does It Take To Write A Climate Report?

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 8:53 am

An iceberg floats through the water in Ilulissat, Greenland, in July. Researchers are studying how climate change and melting glaciers will affect the rest of the world.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Scientists and government representatives are meeting in Stockholm this week to produce the latest high-level review of climate change. It's thousands of pages of material, and if it's done right, it should harbor very few surprises.

That's because it's supposed to compile what scientists know — and what they don't — about climate change. And that's left some scientists to wonder whether these intensive reviews are still the best way to go.

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3:32am

Sun September 8, 2013
Environment

Climate Change Leaves Hares Wearing The Wrong Colors

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 11:40 am

A white snowshoe hare against a brown background makes the animal easy prey.
L.S. Mills Research Photo

The effects of climate change often happen on a large scale, like drought or a rise in sea level. In the hills outside Missoula, Mont., wildlife biologists are looking at a change to something very small: the snowshoe hare.

Life as snowshoe hare is pretty stressful. For one, almost everything in the forest wants to eat you.

Alex Kumar, a graduate student at the University of Montana, lists the animals that are hungry for hares.

"Lynx, foxes, coyotes, raptors, birds of prey. Interestingly enough, young hares, their main predator is actually red squirrels."

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1:03am

Tue September 3, 2013
Environment

Pollution, Not Rising Temperatures, May Have Melted Alpine Glaciers

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:28 am

The Alps' largest glacier, Aletsch Glacier, extends more than 14 miles and covers more than 46 square miles.
Wikimedia.org

Glaciers in the Alps of Europe pose a scientific mystery. They started melting rapidly back in the 1860s. In a span of about 50 years, some of the biggest glaciers had retreated more than half a mile.

But nobody could explain the glacier's rapid decline. Now, a new study from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory uncovers a possible clue to why the glaciers melted before temperatures started rising: Soot from the Industrial Revolution could have heated up the ice.

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1:35am

Thu August 29, 2013
Environment

A Cooler Pacific May Be Behind Recent Pause In Global Warming

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 9:47 am

A study in the journal Nature could help explain why the Earth's average temperature hasn't increased during the past 15 years — despite a long-term trend of global warming.

The Earth's average temperature has risen by more than 1 degree Fahrenheit since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. But the temperature rise has not been moving in lock step with the rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide — mainly from burning fossil fuels — traps heat in the air.

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8:10am

Tue August 27, 2013

VIDEO: Climate Effects On Wildfires Explained In 90 Sec

Lead in text: 
Drought and forest management are big topics in Colorado. More so, following this summer's destructive Black Forest Fire and the 2012 fire season. Penn State Professor Matthew Hurteau explains more on climate's link to fires in this video.
Source: YouTube · Via: The Atlantic
"Well, with prolonged drought, what you're doing is priming the system to make it more flammable. The other side is that we got roughly a century of fire suppression policy. So now, what used to be open forest is pretty closed canopy forest, so there's a lot more trees." - Matthew Hurteau

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