Colorado

Courtesy of Bas Bleu Theatre

The song “Somewhere That’s Green” from the musical “Little Shop of Horrors” is one of Fort Collins actor Jonathan Farwell’s favorites. It was a standard part of his wife, Deb Note-Farwell's, repertoire whenever she was invited to sing.

“And every time I heard it, I cried,” Jonathan said. “So that’s really what happens to me now. I don’t know if worse is the word or maybe better -- to feel what it feels like to miss her that much.”

Erin O'Toole / KUNC

In September 2013, four days of torrential rainfall devastated parts of Colorado’s Front Range, killing nine people and damaging or destroying around 1,800 homes. A number of roads were washed out by floodwaters, stranding thousands of people who had to be helicoptered to safety.

Matt Bloom/KUNC

In September 2013, historic flooding fundamentally changed Jamestown, Colorado. Landslides triggered by massive rains destroyed homes, buried the town’s fire station and left one resident dead.

What happened next was what some call the most ambitious recovery project in the town’s history. The effort is finally wrapping up this fall, leaving residents with a big question: Where do they go from here?

Ashley Jefcoat / KUNC

This summer, real estate agents James Carlson and Erin Spradlin have been taking tourists around the streets of Denver. But it’s not hot properties they’re taking them to see.

The husband-and-wife team recently started the Denver Graffiti Tour, showcasing some of the biggest murals and best street artists in the city, after taking a similar tour in Bogota, Columbia.

“We got to meet locals in a way that we wouldn’t normally have,” Spradlin said. “We got to see a neighborhood we otherwise wouldn’t have. And we got to hear about the history and the politics of that neighborhood through some amazing art.”

Rebecca Jacobson/Inside Energy

Colorado’s three-member Public Utilities Commission gave its approval on Monday to a proposed $2.5 billion investment in solar, wind and natural gas power in the state.

Flickr/Creative Commons

It started as an off-the-cuff Tweet to the Colorado Rockies: “How many retweets for you to buy an organ and let me be the Coors Field organist next season?”

Denver music producer -- and Rockies fan -- Collin Ingram didn’t really expect an answer from the Major League Baseball club, but he got one.

“5,280,000.”

Matt Bloom/KUNC

As students across the state head into another school year, safety and security remain top priorities for educators. Another challenge is preventing teen suicides.

Photo by Patrick Houdek

For more than a decade, a typical “work day” for Anthony Kovacs meant spending time on stage with loud guitars and drums, singing into a microphone as the lead vocalist for the Chicago punk band Shot Baker.

Even when he wasn’t on stage, Kovacs said his daily life was pretty noisy.

“When I wasn’t on tour I was working in music venues as a door guy or whatever I was doing, so I was exposed to loud quite a bit,” he said. “And at some point, I noticed that my hearing wasn’t as sharp as it once was, and it actually started scaring me into wearing hearing protection.”

Courtesy of NCAR/UCAR

A regional energy project entering final planning stages this fall is set to become one of northern Colorado’s largest sources of wind power. 

Scott Dressel-Martin / Courtesy of Denver Botanic Gardens

After three years, “Stinky” -- the Denver Botanic Gardens’ beloved corpse flower -- may be preparing to bloom again.

Denver Botanic Gardens horticulturist Nicholas Giaquinto predicted the rare bloom, which is said to give off an odor much like rotting corpse, to occur in early to mid-September.

Officially known as the “amorphophallus titanum,” it’s related to common house plants the philodendron and the peace lily, Giaquinto said. The rancid smell is used to attract pollinators such as flies and beetles.

The potent plant also attracts humans.

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