Congo

10:10am

Thu July 25, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Midwives Have Become Critical In War Zones

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:24 pm

A midwife holds a newborn at Rabia Balkhi Women's Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Jonathan Saruk International Medical Corps
  • Listen to midwife Emily Slocum describe delivering babies in the dark, with no running water.

In a conflict zone, getting the basics — food, water, shelter — is a constant challenge. And it likely involves being on the move.

Now imagine pregnancy. There might not be a functioning medical facility for miles. And the environment makes the woman and her baby more susceptible to complications.

Aid groups are increasingly relying on conflict midwives to help women in these situations. In dangerous and unstable regions, midwives' jobs are more than delivering babies: They often have to help women who have experienced sexual violence and have reproductive health issues.

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1:02am

Wed July 17, 2013
Shots - Health News

Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 8:45 am

Red blood cells are normally shaped like doughnuts, but sickle cells (purple) are flattened and clump together.
NIH

Sickle cell anemia may not be as well-known as, say, malaria, tuberculosis or AIDS. But every year, hundreds of thousands of babies around the world are born with this inherited blood disorder. And the numbers are expected to climb.

The number of sickle cell anemia cases is expected to increase about 30 percent globally by 2050, scientists said Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is most common, will be the hardest hit.

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7:08am

Tue May 7, 2013
Shots - Health News

Saving Newborns: 'Kangaroo Care' Could Go A Long Way

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 7:46 am

A health worker weighs a Somali baby on scales at a medical clinic in Mogadishu. Babies in Somalia have the highest risk of dying within the first 24 hours after birth.
Carl de Souza AFP/Getty Images

In the developing world, a baby's first day of life is often the most perilous.

Roughly 3 million newborns die each year, the nonprofit Save the Children reported Tuesday. Most of these deaths occur in the first week of life, and more than 1 million babies pass away within 24 hours of being born.

Although the report calls for some big changes in health care systems to prevent newborn deaths, it also says that some simple, inexpensive things could save many lives.

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9:39am

Fri March 22, 2013
The Two-Way

Congo Warlord Faces War Crimes After Turning Himself In

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:42 am

Bosco Ntaganda, a notorious warlord accused of crimes against humanity during Congo's civil war, is headed to an international court after turning himself in at the U.S. Embassy in Rwanda earlier this week.

NPR's Gregory Warner reports that the surrender of Ntaganda, nicknamed "The Terminator," came as a surprise. He's been wanted by the International Criminal Court since 2006 for crimes against humanity, including conscripting child soldiers, murder, rape and sexual slavery allegedly committed in 2002 and 2003 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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4:00pm

Tue March 19, 2013
The Two-Way

Will Congolese Warlord's Weirdly Civil Surrender Get Fellow Rebels A Free Pass?

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 4:19 pm

Gen. Bosco Ntaganda addresses a news conference in Kabati, a village located in Congo's North Kivu province, on Jan. 8, 2009. He showed up at the U.S. Embassy in Kigali on Monday and asked to be transferred to The Hague where is wanted on war crimes charges.
Abdul Ndemere Reuters /Landov

Bosco Ntaganda, the Congolese warlord and rebel leader wanted by the International Criminal Court, showed up at the U.S. Embassy in Kigali on Monday in a taxicab. He was apparently unexpected.

"We did not have any prior notice or consultations with him to indicate that he would do that," State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said Tuesday. "He was a walk-in, in the truest sense of the word."

She said the U.S. is now "working to facilitate his request" to be transported to the Netherlands to stand trial.

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