Drones

3:46pm

Fri February 22, 2013
U.S.

As Police Drones Take Off, Washington State Pushes Back

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 5:28 pm

Last year, Seattle became one of the nation's first cities to buy unmanned drones for use by the police department. Public reaction was less "Gee-whiz" than "What the heck?"

The phrase "unmanned drones" typically conjures images of places like Afghanistan. But the Federal Aviation Administration says it wants to start testing the civilian use of aerial drones here in the U.S. and has already issued special permits to a few police departments interested in trying them out.

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1:18pm

Fri February 22, 2013
The Two-Way

In Document Left Behind By Al-Qaida, 22 Tips To Avoid Drones Strikes

In this Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013 photo, a young vendor waits for clients alongside woven reed mats of the type purchased by fleeing Islamists, apparently to camouflage their vehicles, in Timbuktu, Mali.
Rukmini Callimachi AP

As al-Qaida extremists streamed out of Timbuktu, they left behind a curious document and the Associated Press got its hands on it.

It's written by Abdallah bin Muhammad, a senior commander of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, the Yemeni arm of the group, and it includes 22 bulleted tips on how to evade drone strikes.

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10:04am

Thu February 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Sen. Graham Says 4,700 Killed In U.S. Drone Strikes

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 12:09 pm

U.S. "Predator" drone over Afghanistan in Jan. 2009.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

We've all heard that drone strikes directed against al-Qaida and other militants have been on the rise, but now Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has put a number on deaths by U.S. unmanned aerial vehicle: 4,700.

Graham, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, rattled off the death toll during a talk he gave to the Easley Rotary Club in Easley, S.C., Tuesday afternoon.

"We've killed 4,700," Graham said.

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3:09am

Sun February 17, 2013
The Two-Way

Winning The Battle Remotely: New Medal Awards Evolving Warfare

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 4:13 am

Outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announces a new medal that recognizes combat contributions made far from the battlefield.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images
  • NPR's Tom Bowman On Importance Of Medals
  • Predator Pilots Engage in Remote Control Combat

To get the newest military medal, you don't have to have been on the front lines. In fact, you could work very, very far from any combat.

The Distinguished Warfare Medal, announced by outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta on Wednesday, would recognize drone operators and those engaged in cyberattacks who haven't put themselves in harm's way.

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11:21am

Wed February 13, 2013
The Two-Way

From Desmond Tutu, A Scathing Rebuke Of U.S. Drone Program

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 1:28 pm

Archbishop Desmond Tutu.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

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