Drought

5:43pm

Tue January 29, 2013
Around the Nation

Drought Causes Ripple Effect Along Mighty Mississippi River

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 6:30 pm

International ships call at the busy Port of New Orleans. It's a major shipping convergence point on the Mississippi River. Ships come upriver from the Gulf of Mexico with imports from abroad, and barges come downriver, bringing U.S. goods for export.
Debbie Elliott NPR

The persistent drought is raising questions about how the Mississippi River is managed — both upstream and down.

While cargo traffic upriver has gotten lots of attention, the drought is creating a different set of problems downriver at the mouth of the Mississippi, where saltwater has encroached.

An old-fashioned staff river gauge behind the New Orleans district office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers shows the Mississippi is running just shy of 6 feet above sea level at the river bend.

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3:09pm

Mon January 28, 2013
Environment

The Silver Lining In Drought: 5 Upsides To Rain-Free Weather

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 4:23 pm

iStockphoto.com

Drought is mostly seen as a bad thing — and for good reason. It dries up crops, destroys landscaping and stops ships from moving. But even the lack of rain clouds has a bright side.

Good For Grapes

Last summer it seemed like all Midwestern farmers were upset over the lack of rain. But not all of them were; those growing grapes were embracing the drought.

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12:31pm

Thu January 24, 2013
Environment

Colorado Snowpack: 'The Situation Is Pretty Grim Right Now'

Colorado SNOTEL Snowpack Update Map
National Resources Conservation Service USDA

Colorado’s top water experts met Wednesday to assess the state’s snowpack. The news isn’t good.

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11:30am

Sat January 19, 2013

3:53pm

Sat January 12, 2013
Environment

From Corn Belt To Main Street: The Drought's Far-Reaching Grasp

Originally published on Sat January 12, 2013 5:37 pm

The sun shines above a farm near White City, Kan., in November.
Orlin Wagner AP

The U.S. had its hottest year on record last year. That heat, combined with the relatively dry winter that came before, has brought a historic drought.

From forest fires and low crop yields, to infrastructure and recreation, the drought has been costly, with early estimates putting the cost at between $50 billion and $80 billion.

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