Drought

12:28pm

Fri May 3, 2013
The Two-Way

NASA: Warming Climate Likely Means More Floods, Droughts

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 10:53 am

Flash floods followed heavy rains in northern India in September.
AFP/Getty Images

The Earth's wettest regions are likely to get wetter while the most arid will get drier due to warming of the atmosphere caused by increased levels of carbon dioxide, according to a new NASA analysis of more than a dozen climate models.

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9:46am

Thu May 2, 2013
Agriculture

Drought Far From Over For Southern Colorado Farmers

Plastic lines rows of recently planted cantaloupe seeds in Rocky Ford.
Credit Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

While spring snow storms have eased drought conditions in parts of Northern Colorado, in the southern part of the state the dry weather is forcing farmers to make some tough decisions.

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4:29pm

Wed May 1, 2013
The Salt

Who Paid For Last Summer's Drought? You Did

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 5:10 pm

Corn plants dry in a drought-stricken farm field near Fritchton, Ind., last summer.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Say the words "crop insurance" and most people start to yawn. For years, few nonfarmers knew much about these government-subsidized insurance policies, and even fewer found any fault with them. After all, who could criticize a safety net for farmers that saves them from getting wiped out by floods or drought?

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11:43am

Thu April 25, 2013
Environment

Snowpack OK, Cold Temperatures Better

Elise Thatcher Aspen Public Radio

Recent snow in the mountains is certainly going a long way to boosting the state’s snowpack. For much of the Front Range and parts of the Western Slope, the cold temperatures are making the biggest difference towards relieving some the drought conditions.

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1:25am

Wed April 24, 2013
The Salt

For Corn, Fickle Weather Makes For Uncertain Yields

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 7:06 am

By this time last year, 26 percent of the country's corn crop was already planted. A wet, cold spring means that only 4 percent is in the ground right now.
Seth Perlman AP

Last year's drought wreaked havoc on farmers' fields in much of the Midwest, cutting crop yields and forcing livestock producers to cull their herds. This spring, the rain that farmers needed so badly in 2012 has finally returned. But maybe too much, and at the wrong time.

It's almost the end of April, which is prime time to plant corn. But farmers need a break in the rain so they can get this year's crops in the ground and try to lock in good yields at harvest.

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