Drug Cartels

3:06am

Tue July 16, 2013
Latin America

Vicious Cartel Leader Arrested In Mexico

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:05 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

One of the most brutal and vicious cartel leaders in Mexico has been arrested. Early yesterday morning, Mexican marines, caught the leader of the notorious Zeta gang organization. The country has killed or captured dozens of kingpins in recent years without managing to bring an end to the high murder rates in many areas.

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2:28am

Thu June 13, 2013
Parallels

Once Home To A Dreaded Drug Lord, Medellin Remakes Itself

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:03 pm

Colombian army soldiers patrol Medellin's Loma de Cristobal neighborhood after warring gangs forced dozens of families to flee. Medellin used to be the most dangerous city in the world, but officials embarked on innovative projects designed to make life better in tough neighborhoods.
Paul Smith for NPR

Of all the violent cities of Latin America, one stands out as a great success story: Medellin, a metropolis nestled in the mountains of northwest Colombia.

Once the home of the cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar, it recorded more than 6,300 homicides in 1991, making it the world's murder capital. Then, one city government after another built schools and libraries, parks and infrastructure. The police also received an overhaul and became more adept at going after violent trafficking groups.

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3:06pm

Thu June 6, 2013
The Two-Way

Mexican Authorities Free 165 Immigrants Near Border

Mexican authorities announced today that their military freed 165 immigrants being held captive just across the border from McAllen, Tex.

Government spokesman Eduardo Sánchez Hernández said the military followed a tip into a house in the municipality of Diaz Ordaz on Tuesday. There they found people who said they were on their way to the United States, when they were kidnapped.

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1:20am

Tue April 30, 2013
National Security

U.S. Faces Fight At Intersection Of Crime And Extremism

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 1:27 pm

Gen. Antonio Indjai (left), Guinea-Bissau's army chief of staff, at the funeral of the country's late president, Malam Bacai Sanha, on Jan. 15, 2012. The U.S. says Indjai has been involved in drug trafficking, an allegation he denies. He recently eluded a U.S. sting operation that led to the capture of other officials from his country.
Mamadu Alfa Balde AFP/Getty Images

A suspected drug kingpin from the tiny West African nation of Guinea-Bissau was captured on the high seas by agents from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency earlier this month, brought to Manhattan and is now awaiting trial.

The dramatic sting operation sheds light on what officials say is a growing national security threat: criminal networks teaming up with extremist organizations.

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6:00am

Mon April 29, 2013
Latin America

U.S.-Mexico Alliance Against Drug Cartels In Jeopardy

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Mexico is considering changes to its collaboration with the United States in the war on drugs. That was the news at the top of the story in the Washington Post. But for many of us, some information further down in the article was more revealing because the article detailed just how deep and broad the U.S.-Mexico collaboration is.

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