Education

5:03am

Thu February 26, 2015
NPR Ed

5 Lessons Education Research Taught Us In 2014

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 12:30 pm

LA Johnson/NPR

Studies, research papers, doctoral dissertations, conference presentations — each year academia churns out thousands of pieces of research on education. And for many of them, that's the end of it. They gather dust in the university library or languish in some forgotten corner of the Internet.

A few, though, find their way into the hands of teachers, principals and policymakers. Each year the American Educational Research Association — a 99-year-old national research society — puts out a list of its 10 most-read articles.

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2:32pm

Wed February 25, 2015
NPR Ed

Dissecting A Frog: A Middle School Rite Of Passage

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:30 am

This is a vintage frog dissection diagram.
Flikr Creative Commons

For this series, we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling. Things like the slide rule and protractor, the Presidential Fitness Test and wooden blocks.

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5:08am

Wed February 25, 2015
NPR Ed

Preventing Suicide With A 'Contagion Of Strength'

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 7:52 pm

LA Johnson/NPR

For Whitney Bischoff, high school was tough. On the first day of her freshman year, a childhood friend committed suicide. Things weren't any better at home — her father died when she was 7 and her mom was an alcoholic with an abusive boyfriend.

She had a hard time making friends.

And when all the stress threatened to overwhelm her, she, too, considered suicide.

"I thought family was everything," Bischoff says. "I thought, if I didn't have family support – what am I going to do? Suicide seemed like the only way out."

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2:16pm

Tue February 24, 2015
NPR Ed

College? Career Tech? In Nashville, Teens Do Both

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:16 pm

John Scarborough, a fourth-year pharmacy student at Lipscomb University, talks to high schoolers during a vocational career training class.
Courtesy of Lipscomb University

Schools don't like to use the V-word anymore — "vocational," as in "vocational education." Administrators say the word is outdated, along with the idea of offering job-training courses only to students who are going straight into the workforce.

Nashville, Tenn., is trying a new approach. The public school system there is encouraging every high school student, regardless of college plans, to take three career-training classes before they graduate.

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10:33am

Tue February 24, 2015
NPR Ed

The Great U.S. History Battle

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 1:04 pm

American boys re-enact George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River in 1776.
Jack Fletcher National Geographic

William Faulkner wrote, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." And that's never more true than when people start arguing over how American history should be taught in school.

The current fight involves the Advanced Placement U.S. history exam. Nearly half a million high school students took the test last year, hoping to earn college credit.

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