Education

5:45am

Tue September 9, 2014
NPR Ed

Q&A: One Student's Educational Saga In New Orleans

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 6:21 pm

Whitman Wilcox V, 17, stands for a portrait on Aug. 15 at his home in New Orleans.
Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

This year, NPR Ed is reporting on the dramatic changes in the New Orleans school system.

Whitman Wilcox V attended kindergarten through second grade at a neighborhood public school in the Lower 9th Ward. He had just started the third grade when Hurricane Katrina hit in August 2005. His family was forced to evacuate; he wound up at a Catholic school in Houston.

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5:00am

Tue September 9, 2014
Education

Colorado Experiment To Move Beyond Grade Levels Taps Into Larger Ed Movement

Samuel Mann Flickr-Creative Commons

A few years ago, a school district in Colorado did away with grade levels – instead of being a kindergartner, a third grader, or a sixth grader, students began to be defined by how much they knew.  

Starting in the 2009-2010 school year, Adams County School District 50, a 21-school district serving 10,000 students in the Westminster area that had struggled academically, began implementing a system they called competency-based education. Students, regardless of their age or grade level, are now tested into levels in areas like math and literacy, and then learn at their own pace.

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6:43am

Sat September 6, 2014
NPR Ed

Q&A: Dana Goldstein, Author, 'The Teacher Wars'

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 10:27 am

Dana Goldstein
Michael Lionstar Dana Goldstein

I recently came to the education beat after spending the better part of a decade as a foreign correspondent, mainly reporting on conflicts in the Middle East.

Shortly after turning in my Kevlar vest for chalk dust, I was struck by how intensely polarized the education reform debate is in America. I'd traded real mortar fire for the rhetorical kind: Man the barricades, incoming Common Core!

Which raises the question: How did we get here?

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7:16am

Thu September 4, 2014
NPR Ed

The Myth Of The Superstar Superintendent?

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 6:01 am

LA Johnson/NPR

At corporations, leadership matters. A lot. Think of the impact of the late Steve Jobs at Apple or Facebook's Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg today, to name a couple.

CEOs often play a vital role in bolstering a company's performance, image and culture of success. (Although studies show that obscenely high CEO compensation isn't always the best incentive.)

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3:01am

Thu September 4, 2014
NPR Ed

Gentlemen, Preschool Is Calling

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 7:06 am

LA Johnson/NPR

Glenn Peters knew he would be in the minority when he started training to teach preschool as part of New York City's rollout of universal pre-K, the largest such initiative in the country. But he didn't realize just how rare men are in the profession until he attended a resume-building workshop for aspiring pre-K teachers.

"They couldn't find the bathroom code for the men's bathroom, so I actually had to go to the women's room while someone stood guard outside the bathroom," Peters says. "I knew at that moment that I was a bit of a unicorn."

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