Education

6:36am

Mon July 7, 2014
NPR Ed

What We Don't Know About Summer School

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 8:01 am

While their friends line up for ice cream, some students are stuck in summer school.
Bebeto Matthews AP

It's a warning echoed in countless teen movies — "If you don't pass this class, you'll go to summer school!" Kids for generations have been threatened with the elusive summer school: fail this test, miss this day and kiss your vacation goodbye.

This summer is no exception, with districts around the country pulling students in for all sorts of programs. But surprisingly, it's really hard to get a head count — either nationally or at the district level — of how many kids are going to summer school.

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5:38am

Fri July 4, 2014
NPR Ed

Big Data Comes To College

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 11:18 am

The Course Signals dashboard tells professors how their students are doing at a glance.
Information Technology at Purdue

When students at Purdue University are reading their homework assignments, sometimes the assignments are reading them too.

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8:03am

Wed July 2, 2014
NPR Ed

The Return Of The One-Room Schoolhouse

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 11:52 am

The West Street Schoolhouse in Southington, Ct., was built around 1760. It was heated with a potbellied wood stove.
National Register of Historic Places

Even if your grandpa didn't walk uphill to school both ways, or have to break the ice on the bucket before fetching a drink with the dipper, you probably have iconic images in your mind of the one-room schoolhouse. It's a storied piece of America's past dating back to the Colonial era.

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5:23am

Tue July 1, 2014
NPR Ed

Asking Kids With Special Needs To Clear The Same Bar

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 12:48 pm

Jackson Ellis will soon head to fourth grade. Diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, he's been receiving publicly funded services since he was 15 months old. Jackson's mother, Rebecca Ellis, a single parent, has made education advocacy her career. She's fighting to make sure her son gets the help he needs at his Mandeville, Louisiana public school. That's always been an uphill battle. But, since the state adopted the Common Core State Standards, Ellis says, it's become even harder.

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3:03pm

Mon June 30, 2014
NPR Ed

A Role Model Pipeline For Young Black Men

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:20 am

This story is part of the "Men in America" series on All Things Considered.

Fewer than 2 percent of the nation's elementary school teachers are black men. A program at Clemson University in South Carolina is looking to change that.

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