Education

Coverage of education issues both in Colorado & Nationally from KUNC, NPR & our education news partners.

First rule of Brinton Elementary School run club: Keep those legs moving. Second rule of run club: Have fun.

For 13-year-old Kaprice Faraci and her sister, Kassidy, inspiration to keep moving struck one after school afternoon in the third grade. Video games and TV bored the twins. They were outside when they spotted a small pack of children chugging down their street.

Jonathan Kozol looks back on the events he wrote about 50 years ago, in Death at an Early Age.

In this short film by LA Johnson, he reads from Page 188:

The total outstanding balance of federal student loans: $1.3 trillion.

Jackie Fortier / KUNC

Wyatt has blond hair and a deep tan. He’s sitting at a desk in a noisy classroom, brow furrowed. He cocks his head to the side, his finger moving over a bumpy cover. He stares at the book's title, and then puts it down. Wyatt (KUNC is refraining from using his last name, since he is a student) is having some trouble reading.

He is one of 113 elementary students in the Windsor RE-4 School District who are spending two-and-half hours a day, three days a week brushing up on their reading skills over the summer.

In Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Brimley is the kind of small town where the students of the month in the elementary school get full-page write-ups in the local newspaper.

There's an Indian reservation just up the road, a couple bars, a gas station, a motel and that's about it.

Brimley Elementary serves two groups that often struggle academically. Of the 300 students, more than half are Native American. Many come from low-income families.

For two decades, Texas has treated truancy as a criminal offense. That means most cases were prosecuted in adult courts where children, along with their parents, faced jail and fines of up to $1,500 for missing school — usually 10 or more unexcused absences.

Texas lawmakers now say this policy went too far. So last week, Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, signed a law that no longer treats truancy as a Class C misdemeanor.

It's election season at Canaan Elementary's second grade, in Patchogue, N.Y., and tensions are running high. Today is speech day, and right now it's Chris Palaez's turn.

The 8-year-old is the joker of the class. With a thick mohawk and a mischievous glimmer in his dark eyes, he seems like the kind of kid who would be unfazed by public speaking.

But he's nervous.

For decades, Arthur Levine, the former president of Teachers College, Columbia University, has tried to imagine a new kind of institution for training teachers. He envisions a combination West Point and Bell Labs, where researchers could study alongside future educators, learning what works and what's effective in the classroom. That idea is now set to become a reality.

On a rainy Saturday morning in June, 17-year-old Sarah Choudhury showed up bright and early at her SAT testing center in the town of Lagrangeville in upstate New York. This was her last chance to raise her score before applying for early admission to highly competitive premed programs in the fall.

As she was taking the test, she says, "chaos" struck. There was a discrepancy between the time allotted in the student test booklet for one of the sections, 25 minutes, and the proctor's instructions, just 20 minutes.

Htoo Ler Moo was 7-years-old when his family arrived in a refugee camp in Thailand. Before the camp, his family lived in a tiny village in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, where his parents worked in the fields. They lived in that camp for seven years before they were able to come to the United States as refugees. On Htoo Ler Moo's first day of school in Colorado he only knew basic words like yes, no and hello. Now, he is a high school graduate and looking on to a bigger and brighter future.

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