Environment

5:00am

Mon May 26, 2014
Environment

Is Corn Dust Killing Bees?

Farmer Nathan Anderson wears beekeeping gear to protect himself when he opens or closes the pollen traps on bee hives on his farm. He has allowed researchers to place three pairs of hives on his fields.
Credit Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Nathan Anderson stops his red pick-up truck alongside a cornfield on his farm near Cherokee, Iowa. The young farmer pulls on a heavy brown hoodie, thick, long, sturdy gloves and a beekeeper’s hat with a screened veil. He approaches a pair of hives sitting on the edge of a field recently planted with corn and adjusts a yellow plastic flap that traps some of the pollen the bees bring back to their hive.

Read more

9:07am

Wed May 21, 2014
Agriculture

Now Appearing: Hemp, For The First Time In Decades

At Centennial Seeds in Lafayette, Colo., Ben Holmes is testing hemp varieties. Holmes made his name distributing and breeding strains of medical and recreational marijuana, but recently has become a prominent figure in Colorado’s fledgling hemp industry.
Credit Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

6:06am

Wed May 21, 2014
Environment

Why Those Tiny Microbeads In Soap May Pose Problem For Great Lakes

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 1:19 pm

Researcher Sherri Mason looks for microbeads in a water sample from Lake Michigan. Legislation to phase out products containing the beads is pending in New York and Illinois.
Cheryl Corley

From the shoreline at North Avenue Beach in Chicago, the blue water of Lake Michigan stretches as far as the eye can see. But beneath that pristine image, there's a barely visible threat, says Jennifer Caddick of the Alliance for the Great Lakes: microbeads.

These tiny bits of plastic, small scrubbing components used in hundreds of personal care products like skin exfoliants and soap, can slip through most water treatment systems when they wash down the drain.

Read more

6:00am

Fri May 16, 2014
Agriculture

National Geographic's 5 Steps To Feed The World

On the Vulgamore farm near Scott City, Kan., each combine can harvest up to 25 acres of wheat an hour—as well as real-time data on crop yields. Most of the food Americans eat is now produced on such large-scale, mechanized farms, which grow row after row of a single crop, allowing farmers to cover more ground with less labor.
Credit © George Steinmetz / National Geographic

With the world’s population exploding, we’ll have many more mouths to feed in the near future. But agriculture already uses up tons of resources and land. So how can we grow more food and how can we limit its damage to the environment?

Read more

6:47am

Mon May 12, 2014
Weather

Our Sympathies: Winter Hangs On In Colorado And Wyoming

Mule deer are seen in the snow during a late spring snow storm in Golden, Colorado on Mother's Day.
Rick Wilking Reuters /Landov

If you were just starting to forget the pretty gruesome winter season we just lived through, remember that our friends in the west are not out of the woods: More than a foot of heavy, wet snow blanketed parts of Colorado and Wyoming Sunday into Monday.

The AP reports that the same system spun tornadoes in Nebraska and high winds across the West. The AP adds:

Read more

Pages