Food & Food Culture

1:33am

Mon July 22, 2013
The Salt

New York Toasts Long-Awaited Revival Of Its Distilleries

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:30 am

Tuthilltown Spirits in New York makes a clear corn whiskey, and the first legal aged whiskey in the state since Prohibition, among other products.
Joel Rose/NPR

A century ago, New York could claim that much of its liquor was local, thanks to distilleries large and small that supplied a lot of the whiskey, gin and rum that kept New York City (and the rest of North America) lubricated. Then Prohibition arrived and the industry largely dried up, before trickling back to life in the 21st century.

Now, distillers in New York state are toasting a revival 80 years in the making.

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2:58am

Sat July 20, 2013
The Salt

From Ramen To Rotini: Following The Noodles Of The Silk Road

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 5:22 pm

In Turkey, bits of meat are wrapped in squares of pasta to make manti.
thebittenworld Flickr

Popular lore has it that the Italian merchant Marco Polo was responsible for introducing the noodle to China. This legend appeals to Italians, but if you ask the Chinese, they may beg to differ.

In her latest book, On the Noodle Road, author Jen Lin-Liu chronicles a six-month journey along the historic Silk Road from eastern China, through central Asia, Turkey, Iran and eventually arriving in Italy, in search of the true origin of the noodle.

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11:20am

Fri July 19, 2013
The Salt

France Aims To Net New Drinkers With Cola-Flavored Wine

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:56 am

Fancy some soda with your wine?
Courtesy Haussmann Famille

Brace yourselves, Francophiles.

First, we broke the news about fast food overtaking restaurants in France. Then we reported the shocker that more than a third of French restaurants serve frozen meals. If these revelations ruin your impression of France as a bastion of culinary tradition, you may not want to read further.

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6:35am

Fri July 19, 2013
The Salt

The Ramadan Challenge: Shop And Cook While Hungry And Thirsty

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:31 am

Jehad Outteineh shops at a market near the Damascus gate in the Muslim quarter of Jerusalem's Old City. Around the world, hundreds of millions of Muslims are fasting from sunrise to sunset during Ramadan. Outteineh is shopping for the family's iftar, the meal that breaks the fast.
Emily Harris/NPR

Around the world, hundreds of millions of Muslims are fasting from sunrise to sunset. The Muslim holy month of Ramadan began last week and continues until Aug. 7. That's 30 days of avoiding food and drink all day. But in many families, someone still has to prepare a hearty, and sometimes festive, dinner every night.

"Ramadan is a big change in routine," says Jehad Outteneh, a Palestinian in Jerusalem who shops and cooks for her family of eight.

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2:46pm

Thu July 18, 2013
The Salt

These Pictures Might Tempt You To Eat Bugs

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 8:18 am

Gordon recommends dusting the deep-fried tarantula spider with smoked paprika.
Chugrad McAndrews Reprinted with permission from The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook

Oh, Jiminy Cricket, you've never looked more scrumptious.

The grasshopper kabob is one of several enticing images of insect cuisine included in the new, revised edition of The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook, by avowed entomophagist (i.e., bug eater) David George Gordon.

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