Food & Food Culture

2:38pm

Thu May 16, 2013
The Salt

No More Smuggling: Many Cured Italian Meats Coming To America

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 9:36 am

Even Sophia Loren felt compelled to smuggle mortadella, despite a U.S. ban — well, her character did, anyway, in the 1971 film Lady Liberty.
Warner Bros/The Kobal Collection

American gourmets and lovers of Italian food products, your days as food smugglers are over.

No more stuffing your suitcases with delicacies bought in Italy, hoping the sniffer dogs at JFK or other American airports won't detect the banned-in-the-USA foodstuffs inside your luggage.

In the U.S., they're called cured meats, the French say charcuterie and in Italy, the word for cured-pork products is salumi.

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11:15am

Thu May 16, 2013
The Salt

How Trace Amounts Of Arsenic End Up In Grocery Store Meat

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 9:18 am

Roxarsone, a drug linked to elevated levels of inorganic arsenic in chicken meat, is no longer used in broiler chicken farming, producers say. But another arsenic-based drug is still used to raise turkeys.
iStockphoto

A study published online recently in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives documented slightly elevated levels of arsenic in samples of chicken purchased at grocery stores in 10 cities in the U.S.

So how did trace amounts of this toxin end up in supermarket poultry?

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1:30pm

Wed May 15, 2013
The Salt

Can Star Power Make New Orleans' Food Deserts Bloom?

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 7:59 pm

Wendell Pierce, the actor and co-owner of Sterling Farms grocery store, chats with Dwight Henry, who will be making doughnuts and buttermilk drops in the store.
David Grunfeld The Times-Picayune /Landov

Plenty of celebrities leverage their star power to raise awareness of complicated food issues. Some of the biggest names include Michelle Obama, Jamie Oliver, Prince Charles and Paul McCartney.

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11:06am

Wed May 15, 2013
The Salt

Go Fish (Somewhere Else): Warming Oceans Are Altering Catches

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 5:39 pm

Crew members unload a catch of sockeye salmon at Craig, Alaska, in 2005. Researchers say fish are being found in new areas because of changing ocean temperatures.
Melissa Farlow National Geographic/Getty Images

Climate change is gradually altering the fish that end up on ice in seafood counters around the world, according to a new study.

"The composition of the [global] fish catch includes more and more fish from the warmer areas, and cold-water fish are getting more rare, because the temperatures are increasing," says Daniel Pauly at the University of British Columbia, a co-author of the study.

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1:33am

Wed May 15, 2013
The Salt

Is Eating Too Little Salt Risky? New Report Raises Questions

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 9:08 am

Eat less salt, but not too much less.
iStockPhoto.com

Americans are repeatedly told to cut back on salt to reduce the risk of heart disease. But there are new questions being raised about the possible risks of reducing sodium too much.

So, how low should we go? Currently, the government recommends that Americans should aim for 2,300 milligrams per day. And people older than 50, as well as those with high blood pressure, diabetes or kidney disease are advised to reduce sodium even further, down to 1,500 mg per day.

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