Food & Food Culture

2:59pm

Fri May 10, 2013
The Salt

How Swedish Malort Became Chicago's Mascot Bitter Drink

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 4:43 pm

World Shattered, a cocktail by Tyler Fry of the Chicago bar The Violet Hour. The drink includes R. Franklin's Original Recipe Malort, and tames the bitterness with lemon, honey syrup, raspberry and mint.
Courtesy of Eden Laurin

The people who make Jeppson's Malort, a harshly bitter spirit that's consumed in shots or cocktails, don't mind that their product makes people grimace. Instead, they celebrate it.

Carl Jeppson Co., a Chicago company, has built a minor social media empire around malort's "brutal" flavor; one winner of its slogan contest described the drink as "turning taste buds into taste foes for generations."

Read more

9:49am

Fri May 10, 2013
The Salt

Sago, An Ancient Chinese Starch, Endures In Asian Cooking

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:14 pm

Pearls made from sago starch are common ingredients in Asian desserts and savories.
iStockphoto.com

8:18am

Fri May 10, 2013
The Salt

In The Land Of Wild Ramps, It's Festival Time

Ramps, or wild leeks, are a member of the lily family and resemble scallions with their wide leaves and small, white bulbs tinged a rusty red.
John Blankenship The Register-Herald

Springtime in Appalachia means ramp festival season. But even as ramp festivals attract record numbers of people seeking a fleeting taste of the seasonal garlic-scented greens, scientists warn that overharvesting is forcing wild populations into decline.

Read more

1:13am

Fri May 10, 2013
Food

Unpacking Foreign Ingredients In A Massachusetts Kitchen

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:10 am

A kitchen renovation revealed some unusual items Laurel Ruma had picked up while traveling: chickpea flour, harissa and chia seeds.
Laurel Ruma

This is the second installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, a food series about improvising with what you have on hand. Got a food that has you stumped? Submit a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites!

Laurel Ruma, an NPR listener from Medford, Mass., didn't realize quite how much she had gathered up from her travels until renovating her kitchen last summer. She unearthed things like harissa, chickpea flour and black chia seeds.

Read more

3:11pm

Thu May 9, 2013
The Salt

Big Ag Agrees to Conserve Cropland, But At What Cost?

Peanut plants grow on a Halifax, N.C., farm that received federal subsidies in 2011.
Robert Willett MCT /Landov

Taxpayers help subsidize crop insurance premiums for farmers to the tune of about $9 billion dollars, a figure that's growing each year. These policies protect farmers from major losses, and help support their income even if there's no loss of crops.

And in return? Well, environmentalists argue that farmers who receive this financial support should be required to be good stewards of the land.

Read more

Pages