Food & Food Culture

1:32pm

Thu May 2, 2013
Found Recipes

This Little Piggy Cookie Is A Sweet Mexican Find

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 4:22 pm

A few years ago, Pati Jinich had never heard of Piggy Cookies. But after numerous recipe requests and a chance encounter with the treats in her home country, they've become a family favorite.
Courtesy of Penny De Los Santos

Mexican Piggy Cookies are known by many names — cerditos, cochinitos, marranitos or puerquitos. Sweetened with unprocessed cane sugar and honey, and spiced with cinnamon, the cutout cookies puff when you bake them.

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1:29pm

Thu May 2, 2013
The Salt

Can Salmon Farming Be Sustainable? Maybe, If You Head Inland

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 4:43 pm

These sockeye salmon were raised at a land-based fish farm in Langley, British Columbia.
Courtesy Willowfield Enterprises

Is salmon farming ever sustainable?

For years, many marine biologists have argued that the floating, open-ocean net pens that produce billions of pounds of salmon per year also generate pollution, disease and parasites.

In some places in western Canada, the open-ocean salmon farming industry has been blamed for the collapse of wild salmon populations in the early 2000s — though other research has challenged that claim.

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9:37am

Thu May 2, 2013
The Salt

Grocery Home Delivery May Be Greener Than Schlepping To The Store

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 8:20 am

Amazon Fresh delivery man Tim Wilkie totes food to a house on Mercer Island, Wash.
Joe Nicholson AP

Home grocery delivery sounds like a frill for people too lazy to schlep to the store. But having food delivered can be more environmentally friendly than driving to the store, researchers say.

Having groceries delivered can cut carbon dioxide emissions by at least half, compared to driving to the store, according to a new study. That's because the delivery truck offers the equivalent of a "shared ride" for the food.

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4:40pm

Wed May 1, 2013
The Salt

Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 5:48 pm

The four cuts at the top of this skull "are clear chops to the forehead," says Smithsonian forensic anthropologist Douglas Owsley. Based on forensic evidence, researchers think the blows were made after the person died.
Donald E. Hurlbert Smithsonian

"First they ate their horses, and then fed upon their dogs and cats, as well as rats, mice and snakes."

So says James Horn of the historical group Colonial Williamsburg, paraphrasing an account by colony leader George Percy of what conditions were like for the hundreds of men and women stranded in Jamestown, Va., with little food in the dead of winter in 1609.

They even ate their shoes. And, apparently, at least one person.

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4:29pm

Wed May 1, 2013
The Salt

Who Paid For Last Summer's Drought? You Did

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 5:10 pm

Corn plants dry in a drought-stricken farm field near Fritchton, Ind., last summer.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Say the words "crop insurance" and most people start to yawn. For years, few nonfarmers knew much about these government-subsidized insurance policies, and even fewer found any fault with them. After all, who could criticize a safety net for farmers that saves them from getting wiped out by floods or drought?

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