Food & Food Culture

2:10pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Recipes

A 'Charleston Kitchen' Full Of Foraged And Forgotten Foods

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 8:26 pm

Matt Lee (left) and Ted Lee (right) grew up in Charleston, S.C. After leaving the South as young adults, they founded a mail-order food company, The Lee Bros. Boiled Peanut Catalogue. They have written two previous cookbooks of Southern cuisine.
Squire Fox Clarkson Potter

A new cookbook by the Lee brothers just might inspire daydreams of a food-centric vacation to South Carolina. It's called The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen, and in it, Matt and Ted Lee feature recipes and stories from the Southern port city they grew up in. The brothers joined NPR's Melissa Block to talk about Charleston's distinctive food culture, starting with the dishes that they'd put on a typical Charleston menu.

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12:21pm

Thu April 18, 2013
The Salt

Study Finds No Harm In Occasional Drink During Pregnancy

iStockphoto.com

Is the occasional glass of wine or beer OK for moms-to-be?

According to a new study published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, there doesn't seem to be any measurable risk.

The study found that drinking up to two alcoholic beverages per week during pregnancy is not linked to developmental problems in children. But even the study's authors caution that abstaining from alcohol is still best for mothers-to-be.

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9:51am

Thu April 18, 2013
The Salt

From Vine To Pen: There's More Than One Way Wine Fuels Writing

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 1:20 pm

Ernest Hemingway once said, "A man does not exist until he is drunk."
AP

Sure, we all know alcohol has fueled plenty a writing session. William Faulkner — who once said, "civilization begins with distillation" — was known to have kept a bottle by his side while he typed away throughout his writing career.

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6:00am

Thu April 18, 2013
Agriculture

Gluten-Free By Popular Demand

Eliminating certain foods from a diet can be risky, says Paula Vandelicht, a nutritionist at a Hy-Vee grocery store in Columbia, Mo. Among other things, she advises customers about the shortcomings of a gluten-free diet.
Abbie Fentress Swanson Harvest Public Media

Gluten-free diets, which bar food containing wheat, rye and barley, are wildly popular today. Which is surprising since only about one percent of the U.S. population suffers from Celiac disease, the disorder that causes their immune systems to reject the pesky gluten.

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5:04pm

Wed April 17, 2013
The Salt

In Meat Tests, More Data Tying Human Illness To Farm Antibiotics

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 3:26 pm

Are the antibiotics the livestock industry uses on animals responsible for antibiotic-resistant infections in people? Bacteria are notoriously hard to follow from farm to fork, but more pieces of the puzzle are coming together that suggest the answer is yes.

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