Food & Food Culture

3:22pm

Wed April 10, 2013
The Salt

Cities Turn Sewage Into 'Black Gold' For Local Farms

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:07 am

Thick jets of processed sewage arc out 30 to 40 feet from giant moving spreaders at Birmingham Farm in Kansas City, Mo.
Frank Morris for NPR

On a normal day, Kansas City, Mo., processes more than 70 million gallons of raw sewage. This sewage used to be a nuisance, but Kansas City, and a lot of municipalities around the country, are now turning it into a resource for city farmers hard up for fertilizer.

After the sewage has been processed at a treatment plant, it's piped out to Birmingham Farm on the north side of the Missouri River.

Read more

3:10pm

Wed April 10, 2013
The Salt

As Promised: Obama Wants To Overhaul Global Anti-Hunger Efforts

Palestinians unload bags of flour donated by USAID, or the United States Agency for International Development, at a depot in the West Bank village of Anin in 2008.
Mohammed Ballas AP

The White House unveiled its proposal Wednesday for drastic changes in government programs that donate food to fight hunger abroad — and surprised no one.

As we reported last week, rumors of such an overhaul had been circulating for weeks, arousing both hope and anger among organizations involved in global anti-hunger programs.

Read more

12:26pm

Wed April 10, 2013
The Salt

Earliest Cookware Was Used To Make Fish Soup

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:37 pm

Pots like this 15,000-year-old vessel from Japan are among the world's earliest cookware.
Tokamachi City Museum

Roasted fish on a stick is OK, but wouldn't it be nice to be able to cook up some fish soup?

That's what might have crossed the minds of hunter-gatherers who made the world's first cooking pots. A new analysis of pottery made 15,000 years ago in what's now Japan reveals that it was used to cook seafood, probably salmon.

Read more

10:19am

Wed April 10, 2013
The Salt

A Battle Over Antibiotics In Organic Apple And Pear Farming

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 9:31 am

Note: We've updated the headline on this post for the sake of clarity. To be clear, it's the apple and pear tree blossoms that get sprayed with antibiotics, not the fruit itself.

Apples and especially pears are vulnerable to a nasty bacterial infection called fire blight that, left unchecked, can spread quickly, killing fruit trees and sometimes devastating whole orchards.

Read more

11:27pm

Tue April 9, 2013
Agriculture

Potato Industry Banks On 'Linda'

Kristin Mastre is the kind of influential shopper the potato industry is targeting, as she buys food for her family, including sons Carter and Logan.
Credit Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

At a Fort Collins grocery store, Kristin Mastre paused for a minute in front a large bin of Russet and red potatoes. She picked out a few handfuls and continued on, her two boys, Carter, 4, and Logan, 7, in tow.

Read more

Pages