Food & Food Culture

1:33am

Mon February 11, 2013
Asia

Auntie Anne's Pretzels In Beijing: Why The Chinese Didn't Bite

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 9:41 am

The China Twist by Wen-Szu Lin chronicles the author's (ultimately unsuccessful) attempt to bring Auntie Anne's pretzels to China.
Courtesy

The lure of the China market is legendary. The dream: Sell something to 1.3 billion people, and you're set.

The reality is totally different.

Ask the MBAs from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School who tried to launch Auntie Anne's pretzels in China. The result is a funny, instructive and occasionally harrowing journey that is now the subject of a new book, The China Twist.

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8:18am

Sat February 9, 2013
The Salt

What To Do With All That Snow? Cook It

For a "Cooking With Snow" class taught through Knowledge Commons DC, instructor Willie Shubert made baobing, a shaved ice dessert from China.
Courtesy of Rachel Sadon

Two feet of snow can be a major inconvenience. We feel for you, friends in the Northeast. To help you work through that serious snow surplus, we shuffled through our virtual recipe box for snow cuisine.

It's like being given lemons and making lemonade, though you definitely don't want to be doing anything with lemon-colored snow you find outside.

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5:47am

Sat February 9, 2013
The Salt

British Outrage Grows As Horsemeat Pops Up In More Foods

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 6:42 am

Frozen-food company Findus recalled its beef lasagne meals earlier this week because they contain horsemeat.
Scott Heppell AP

They like riding them. They like racing them. They bet on them, hunt on them and patrol the streets on them.

But to most who live in the land of the Beefeater, the idea of eating a horse in peacetime is as generally repugnant as grilling one the queen's corgis and gobbling it up with ketchup and fries.

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1:38pm

Fri February 8, 2013
The Salt

When The Microbes Are Happy, The Brewer Is Happy

Yeast affects several aspects of beer including the foam, or head, that forms on the of the glass. If fermentation is too vigorous, too many of the foam-stabilizing proteins may be lost.
Cate Gillon Getty Images

Yeast can be pretty demanding little buggers, despite being unicellular microscopic organisms. Brewers know they must appease them to get the beer they want.

"It's yeast-strain dependent, it's environment, it's temperature, oxygen levels," says Matt Brophy, brewmaster of Flying Dog Brewery in Frederick, Md. "There's a lot of variables that you need to have a high level of control over."

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7:43am

Fri February 8, 2013
The Salt

Chinese New Year: Dumplings, Rice Cakes And Long Life

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 2:37 pm

Year cakes made of sticky rice are among the traditional Chinese New Year foods.
Ju-x Flickr.com

About 3,000 years ago, give or take a couple of decades, the Chinese people began celebrating the beginning of their calendar year with a joyful festival they called Lunar New Year. They cleaned their homes, welcomed relatives, bought or made new clothes and set off firecrackers. And there was feasting and special offerings made to the Kitchen God for about two weeks.

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