Food & Food Culture

3:12am

Sun December 30, 2012
Commentary

On Your Plate In 2013, Expect Kimchi And Good-For-You Greens

Originally published on Sun December 30, 2012 3:14 pm

Commentator Bonny Wolf expects Asian cuisine such as kimchi fried rice to become even more popular in 2013.
iStockphoto.com

Weekend Edition food commentator Bonny Wolf offers her predictions of what we'll eat in the new year.

Asia is the new Europe. It's been gradual: from pan-Asian, Asian fusion and Asian-inspired to just deciding among Vietnamese, Korean, Tibetan and Burmese for dinner.

Should we have the simple food of the Thai plateau or the hot, salty, sour foods of southern Thailand?

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2:18pm

Fri December 28, 2012
The Salt

One Lunch Lady's Cafeteria Conversion

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 4:02 pm

Kathy Del Tonto (far right) participates in a class that teaches school cafeteria workers how to prepare meals from scratch.
LiveWell Colorado

Kathy Del Tonto started cooking school food 30 years ago in the Montrose school district at the foot of Colorado's San Juan Mountains. Back then, the cafeteria workers made everything from scratch.

"My first kitchen that I managed was a little country school out south of town, and we made our own ketchup and everything," she says.

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7:56am

Fri December 28, 2012
The Salt

An Evolutionary Whodunit: How Did Humans Develop Lactose Tolerance?

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 10:41 am

Thousands of years ago, a mutation in the human genome allowed many adults to digest lactose and drink milk.
iStockphoto.com

Got milk? Ancient European farmers who made cheese thousands of years ago certainly had it. But at that time, they lacked a genetic mutation that would have allowed them to digest raw milk's dominant sugar, lactose, after childhood.

Today, however, 35 percent of the global population — mostly people with European ancestry — can digest lactose in adulthood without a hitch.

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4:37am

Fri December 28, 2012
Author Interviews

'The Book Of Gin' Distills A Spirited History

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 11:56 am

Workers pose for a photo at the Hoboken de Bie & Co. gin distillery in Rotterdam, Netherlands, circa 1900. By the end of the 19th century, cocktail culture had helped make gin a more respectable spirit.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Unlike a good martini, the story of gin isn't smooth; it's long, complex, sordid and, as Richard Barnett has discovered, it makes for tantalizing material. Barnett's newly published The Book of Gin traces the liquor's life, from its beginnings in alchemy to its current popularity among boutique distillers.

Barnett joins NPR's Renee Montagne to discuss the medicinal origins and changing reputation of gin.


Interview Highlights

On gin's medicinal origins

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4:37am

Fri December 28, 2012
Author Interviews

Tamari Greens, Miso Yams: Chef Gives Vegans Multicultural Flavor

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 12:18 pm

Jennifer Martiné Da Capo Lifelong Books

Veganism has long been thought of as a bland, fringe diet typically associated with hippies or trend-setting Hollywood types. But chef Bryant Terry is trying to chip away at that stereotype.

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