Food & Food Culture

5:09am

Thu December 6, 2012

9:19am

Wed December 5, 2012
The Salt

Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit

Tea a dangerous habit? Women have long made a ritual of it, but in 19th century Ireland, moral reformers tried to talk them out of it. At the time, tea was considered a luxury, and taking the time to drink it was an affront to the morals of frugality and restraint.
iStockphoto.com

Given tea's rap today as both a popular pick-me-up and a health elixir, it's hard to imagine that sipping tea was once thought of as a reckless, suspicious act, linked to revolutionary feminism.

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5:21am

Wed December 5, 2012
Food

British Burger Is Hot, Red Hot

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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12:36am

Wed December 5, 2012
The Salt

Milk Producers Peer Over The Dairy Cliff

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 7:09 am

Dairy farmer Bob Andrews feeds heifers in the same barn his grandfather used. He says today "the harder you work, the further you get behind."
David Sommerstein NCPR

There's more than one cliff drawing controversy this month. The federal farm bill is one of many items caught in congressional gridlock. The bill resets U.S. agriculture policy every four years, and most farmers are still covered by crop insurance and other programs until next planting season. But there's one exception: dairy.

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12:34am

Wed December 5, 2012
The Salt

Palestinian Olive Harvest Turns Bitter As Economy Sputters

Originally published on Fri December 14, 2012 7:12 am

Palestinian women harvest olive trees near the occupied West Bank village of Deir Samet near the town of Hebron.
Hazem Bader AFP/Getty Images

Across the West Bank, olive harvesting season is drawing to a close once again. But this year, the usually joyous occasion has become grimly purposeful because the Palestinian economy, according to some economists, is being held hostage to politics, and is on the verge of collapse.

In the West Bank village of Deir Ibzie, Amal Karajeh and her husband, Basem, comb through the leaves and branches of an olive tree in their front yard.

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