Food & Food Culture

1:03pm

Fri August 3, 2012
The Salt

If Almonds Bring You Joy, Enjoy More For Fewer Calories

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:10 am

Almonds may have 20 percent less calories than previously thought.
iStockphoto.com

Scientists are starting to discover that the standard way of measuring calories, established more than 100 years ago, may not be terribly accurate when it comes to higher fat, high-fiber foods like nuts. But when it comes to almonds, the count may be off by a whole lot.

Food scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently published a new study that finds almonds have about 20 percent fewer calories than previously documented.

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8:59am

Fri August 3, 2012
The Salt

Canning History: When Propaganda Encouraged Patriotic Preserves

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:11 am

During World War II, the government used posters to encourage Americans to grow and preserve their own foods as a way to aid the war effort. Produced by the Office of War Information in 1943.
Northwestern University Libraries

Recently, home canning has seen a rush in popularity, and even upscale retailers like Williams-Sonoma want a share of the idea that a pint of home-canned jam is a fun gift idea. But during both world wars, canning saw another surge, this time prompted by colorful propaganda sponsored by the United States government.

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3:20pm

Thu August 2, 2012
The Salt

Extreme Makeover, Potato Edition

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:12 am

Jane Greenhalgh NPR

The sizzle seems to be gone from America's long-term relationship with the potato. Consumers are eating fewer of them, especially the kind that's not fried in a vat of hot oil. But what if a new and different potato arrived in town? A stylish one, with colorful flesh that was good for you, too?

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8:35am

Thu August 2, 2012
The Salt

How Climate Change Is Changing The Oyster Business

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 9:30 am

Scientists blame higher levels of carbon dioxide in Pacific Ocean waters caused by global warming for the failure of oyster seeds to thrive in hatcheries.
Eric Risberg AP

Austin Docter has worked at a shellfish plant in Shelton, Wash., for 18 years and has a lot of words to describe what he calls the flavor profiles of oysters: Minerally. Metallic-y. Sweet. Buttery.

"Wherever oysters are grown, they take on the characteristics of the algae and water that they grow up in," Docter says. "It's a lot like French wine."

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3:30pm

Tue July 31, 2012
The Salt

Bhutan Bets Organic Agriculture Is The Road To Happiness

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 9:32 am

A Bhutanese farmer puts her harvest of chilies on the roof of a shed to dry and protect it from wild boars, deer, and monkeys in 2006.
James L. Stanfield National Geographic/Getty Images

The tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan drew international attention a few years back for saying gross national happiness should trump gross domestic product when measuring a nation's progress. If you're going to prioritize happiness, the Bhutanese thinking goes, you'd better include the environment and spiritual and mental well-being in your calculations.

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