Food & Food Culture

9:06am

Thu August 14, 2014
The Salt

Beneath These Masks Is An Artist Conflicted By Junk Food

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 10:56 am

British photographer James Ostrer named his photographs after the European codes for food additives.
James Ostrer

British photographer James Ostrer purchased about $8,000 worth of junk food over the past two years — enough to fill up six or seven cars.

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4:32pm

Wed August 13, 2014
The Salt

Shifting Climate Has North Dakota Farmers Swapping Wheat For Corn

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 9:29 am

Dan Selvig says wetter conditions helped convince his family to shift their plantings to corn.
John Ydstie NPR

Overall, climate change is predicted to hurt agriculture around the world. It could even threaten corn production in the Corn Belt.

But in North Dakota conditions are now better for raising corn, and that's a big benefit for farmers.

When I was growing up in Wolford, N.D., up near the Canadian border, wheat was king. It had been the dominant crop since the prairie was first plowed in the late 1800s. So it was kind of strange to go back this summer and find Larry Slaubaugh, a local farmer, filling his 18-wheeler with corn from a huge steel grain bin.

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12:54pm

Wed August 13, 2014
The Salt

Edible Flowers Find A Sweet Companion In Chocolate

Originally published on Wed August 13, 2014 2:06 pm

John Clemons takes flowers out of their natural context with his newest venture, Coco Savvy, which combines them with chocolate.
Courtesy of Coco Savvy

People have been nibbling on flowers for quite some time; they have historically been considered cleansing for the body, and for centuries they were candied, pickled or made into syrup.

But now, edible flowers are being introduced to new markets — and it's a sweet concept. John Clemons, a long-time edible flower purveyor, recently launched a venture called Coco Savvy, which combines crystallized, glazed herbs and flowers and chocolate.

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3:20pm

Tue August 12, 2014
The Salt

Iowa's Corn Farmers Learn To Adapt To Weather Extremes

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 9:32 am

Farmer Seth Watkins (left) and agronomist Matt Liebman stand amid native prairie grasses near Des Moines, Iowa. The conservation strip is used to stop soil erosion.
John Ydstie NPR

Climate change is creating all kinds of challenges and opportunities for business. One of the sectors that feels the effects most immediately is agriculture. Already, weather patterns are making it more challenging to raise corn — even in Iowa — in the middle of the Corn Belt.

Seth Watkins raises corn and cattle in southern Iowa, and he recalls the memorable weather from 2012.

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2:58pm

Tue August 12, 2014
The Salt

Unlocking France's Secrets To Safer Raw Milk Cheese

Originally published on Fri August 15, 2014 1:28 pm

A French cheesemaker sets up wheels of Reblochon, a semi-soft cheese made from raw cow's milk, for maturing in a farm in the French Alps. Anglophone cheesemakers say translating a French government cheese manual will help them make safer raw milk cheese.
Jean-Pierre Clatot AFP/Getty Images

In the English-speaking world, our approach to making cheese for most of the last 60 years has been like a Texas gunslinger's: kill bacteria, ask questions later. If it's not pasteurized, it's dangerous, the thinking goes.

But in France, raw milk cheese is a very big deal, long considered safe and revered for its flavor. The country cultivates its 350-plus cheeses — many of which are made with raw milk — like children, claiming that the bacteria in the raw milk impart unique characteristics – grassy, metallic, buttery and so on.

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