Genetics

2:54pm

Tue August 6, 2013
The Salt

Heck No Or Let's Go? Your Thoughts On Lab-Grown Meat

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 3:52 pm

The scientists who developed the in vitro beef say it could help solve the coming food crisis and combat climate change.
David Parry / PA Wire

Would you taste or buy a lab-grown hamburger if you could? That's the question we posed Monday at the end of our report on the world's first in vitro burger, launched this week at a tasting event in London that was streamed via the Internet.

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4:03pm

Mon August 5, 2013
Shots - Health News

Harsh In Hard Times? A Gene May Influence Mom's Behavior

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:51 am

A gene known as DRD2 affects the brain's dopamine system and is known to be associated with aggressive behavior.
iStockphoto.com

A gene that affects the brain's dopamine system appears to have influenced mothers' behavior during a recent economic downturn, researchers say.

At the beginning of the recession that began in 2007, mothers with the "sensitive" version of a gene called DRD2 became more likely to strike or scream at their children, the researchers say. Mothers with the other "insensitive" version of the gene didn't change their behavior.

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2:00pm

Mon August 5, 2013
The Salt

Long Awaited Lab-Grown Burger Is Unveiled In London

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 3:04 pm

Scientists say commercial production of cultured beef could begin within 10 to 20 years.
David Parry / PA Wire

After three months, $330,000 and a high-profile media blitz, the world's first hamburger grown in a lab made its worldwide debut Monday.

The unveiling of "cultured beef," as the burger is branded, was a production worthy of the Food Network era, complete with chatty host, live-streamed video, hand-picked taste testers, a top London chef and an eager audience (made up mostly of journalists). Rarely has a single food gotten such star treatment.

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3:23pm

Wed July 24, 2013
Environment

What's Swimming In The River? Just Look For DNA

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:34 pm

Biologists normally look for the hellbender slamander, which is known by the nickname "snot otter," under rocks in streams. But now there's a gentler way: They can take water samples and look for traces of the animals' DNA.
Robert J. Erwin Science Source

If you want to protect rare species, first you have to find them. In the past few years, biologists have developed a powerful new tool to do that. They've discovered that they can often find traces of animal DNA in streams, ponds — even oceans.

The idea took root just five years ago, when biologists in France found they could detect invasive American bullfrogs simply by sampling pond water and looking for an exact genetic match to the frogs' DNA.

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12:43pm

Tue July 16, 2013
Shots - Health News

Mining Cell Data To Answer Cancer's Tough Questions

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 2:47 pm

Chemistry, genetics and computing give us clues to understand cancer cells.
iStockphoto.com

Sometimes a drug hits cancer hard. Sometimes the cancer cells are unfazed. But it's often hard to know which outcome to expect.

A group of scientists at the National Cancer Institute has spent the last three years turning some mathematical algorithms loose on giant sets of data to better understand the relationship between cancerous cells and cancer drugs.

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