Genetics

2:19pm

Thu May 9, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Can Identical Twins Turn Out So Different?

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 3:41 pm

But what about their personalities?
iStockphoto.com

A study of genetically identical mice is providing some hints about humans. How can one identical twin be a wallflower while the other is the life of the party?

The study of 40 young mice found that their behavior grew increasingly different over three months, even though the mice shared the same genes and lived in the same five-level cage, researchers report Thursday in the journal Science.

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5:29pm

Mon April 15, 2013
Shots - Health News

Justices Appear Skeptical Of Patenting Human Genes

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 6:44 am

Medical geneticist Dr. Harry Ostrer (center) talks to the press outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. The court heard oral arguments on the highly charged question of whether human genes can be patented.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

In a case considered pivotal to the future of science and medicine, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday about a claim that human genes can be patented.

Contending that genes can be patented are the biotech and pharmaceutical industries, which see patents as the keys to new scientific exploration. On the other side are doctors, patients and many scientists, who see gene patents as an attempt to monopolize and block future exploration in the new universe of genetics.

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1:01am

Mon April 15, 2013
Shots - Health News

Supreme Court Asks: Can Human Genes Be Patented?

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 6:45 am

Artist's representation of DNA.
iStockphoto.com

Same-sex marriage got huge headlines at the Supreme Court last month, but in the world of science and medicine, the case being argued on Monday is far more important. The lawsuit deals with a truly 21st century issue — whether human genes may be patented.

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12:27pm

Wed April 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Test-Tube Baby Pioneer Dies

Dr. Robert Edwards holds the world's first "test-tube baby," Louise Brown, on July 25, 1978. A midwife stands in the center, with gynecologist Patrick Steptoe on the right.
Keystone Getty Images

The man whose research led to the world's first test-tube baby more than three decades ago, has died at age 87.

Robert Edwards, who later won the Nobel Prize, began experimenting with in vitro fertilization, or IVF, in the late 1960s. His work, controversial at the time, eventually led to the birth of the world's first "test tube baby," Louise Brown, on July 25, 1978.

Since then, IVF has resulted in about 5 million babies worldwide, according to the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology.

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1:04pm

Tue April 2, 2013
The Two-Way

DNA-Mapped Furniture Really Ties The Room Together ... With You

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 1:53 pm

The Darwin Table is created from a person's unique DNA profile.
Tjep. via Wired Magazine

Furnishing a new apartment or house can be tough; sometimes you just can't find that end table or couch that is uniquely "you."

Well, as Wired reports, a Dutch design studio is trying to change that.

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