Germany

2:47pm

Sun May 19, 2013
NPR Story

Remembering The Long Lost Germans Of Texas

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 4:18 pm

More than a century ago, German settlers found a pocket of Texas to call home between Austin and San Antonio. And once the local lingo merged with their own language, it proved to be an interesting dialect. Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden speaks with University of Texas professor Hans Boas, who has been archiving the last remaining speakers of this unique blend.

1:02am

Tue May 7, 2013
The Changing Lives Of Women

Germany's Paradox: Family-Friendly Benefits, But Few Kids

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 9:04 am

German Labor Minister Ursula von der Leyen (at left, shown here with German Chancellor Angela Merkel) has been the main government architect of measures aimed at helping women reconcile careers with having children.
John MacDougall AFP/Getty Images

Germany is regarded as one of the most generous countries in the world when it comes to helping women raise families. The government invests about $260 billion each year into 156 separate family-friendly benefits, including health care, generous parental leave, subsidized day care and tax breaks.

Yet on a continent with low birthrates, Germany has the lowest of all, with just 1.39 children per woman.

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2:11pm

Mon May 6, 2013
The Two-Way

Germany Arrests 93-Year-Old 'Auschwitz Guard'

Barbed wire encloses the concentration camp of Aushwitz-Birkenau in Krakow, Poland.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

German authorities have arrested a 93-year-old man they say served as a guard at the Auschwitz extermination camp.

Hans Lipschis was deported from the United States to Germany after U.S. authorities found that he lied about his past.

The AP reports:

"Lipschis was taken into custody after authorities concluded there was 'compelling evidence' he was involved in crimes at Auschwitz while there from 1941 to 1945, prosecutor Claudia Krauth said.

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6:42am

Sun May 5, 2013
World

Foreigners At Home: Turkey Beckons To Germany's Turks

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 4:39 pm

The euro crisis and Islamophobia are making Turkey more appealing to the descendants of Turkish immigrants who have been living in Germany.
Julian Finney Getty Images

In 1961, desperate to increase its labor force, West Germany signed an employment agreement with Turkey and launched a wave of immigration that continues to have repercussions today.

Now, after years of being treated as second-class citizens in Europe's economic powerhouse, large numbers of Turks — descendants of the first wave of immigrants — are returning to Turkey.

In A Strange Land

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8:44am

Fri May 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Murder Trial Of Alleged Neo-Nazi Has Germans On Edge

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 11:07 am

Activists in Munich protest right-wing violence last month.
Johannes Simon Getty Images

The trial in Munich of an alleged neo-Nazi woman accused as an accomplice in a string of murders of mostly ethnic Turks is, as The Associated Press writes, "forcing Germans to confront painful truths about racism and the broader treatment of immigrants in society."

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