Health

7:17am

Tue June 25, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Morning-After Pill Won't Stop All Unintended Pregnancies

Almost half of all pregnancies in the U.S. are unintended.
Rudyanto Wijaya iStockphoto.com

Women of all ages will soon be able to buy emergency contraceptives over the counter without a prescription, now that the Obama administration has decided to stop fighting a judge's order to make the drugs more easily available.

But better access to emergency contraception doesn't necessarily reduce rates of unintended pregnancy, research has found. Why that's so remains unclear, although researchers have some ideas.

Read more

10:03pm

Mon June 24, 2013
Shots - Health News

Top Medicare Prescribers Rake In Speaking Fees From Drugmakers

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 3:38 pm

How does the doctor decide what to write on the prescription pad?
iStockphoto.com

When the blood pressure drug Bystolic hit the market in 2008, it faced a crowded field of cheap generics.

So its maker, Forest Laboratories, launched a promotional assault on the group in the best position to determine Bystolic's success: those in control of prescription pads. It flooded the offices of health professionals with drug reps, and it hired doctors to persuade their peers to choose Bystolic — even though the drug hadn't proved more effective than competitors.

Read more

4:27pm

Mon June 24, 2013
Shots - Health News

Could LeBron And RGIII Help Sell The Affordable Care Act?

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:26 pm

Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III already promotes Subway sandwiches. Will health insurance be next?
Carolyn Kaster AP

Who's going to be more successful at selling health insurance to young men this fall: NBA MVP LeBron James, NFL rookie of the year Robert Griffin III, or Mom? If officials at the Department of Health and Human Services get their way, all may be drafted.

Read more

10:54am

Mon June 24, 2013
Shots - Health News

Doctors Say Wait Longer Before Treating Kids' Sinus Infections

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 2:40 pm

Colds can easily turn into sinus infections in children.
iStockphoto.com

Children often get sinus infections after they've had a cold.

It can be hard for parents and doctors to tell when those infections need treatment with antibiotics, and when they should be left to get better on their own.

The nation's pediatricians are trying to make that call a bit easier. In new guidelines released today, they say that it's OK to wait a while longer to see if a child gets better before treating a sinus infection with antibiotics. Now parents can wait and see what happens for 13 days instead of 10 days, the pediatricians recommend.

Read more

8:58am

Mon June 24, 2013

Pages