Health

1:40am

Mon May 6, 2013
Shots - Health News

Young Girls May Get More 'Teaching Time' From Parents Than Boys Do

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 10:27 am

Of Blocks And Books: Parents may be more likely to take a young daughter to the library than a son, and to read to the girl for longer periods of time, a new analysis suggests.
Hulton Archive iStockphoto.com

For some years now, teachers and parents have noted something about boys and girls. Starting in elementary school, young girls often score better on reading and math tests than young boys do.

The differences are uneven on different tests and do not describe the experience of every child, but empirical studies do document a difference.

Now, two economists are proposing a partial explanation for the disparity that might give some parents heartburn.

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5:44pm

Fri May 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Marist Poll Explores How Old Is Old

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 5:52 pm

Lee Miringoff, head of Marist College's Institute for Public Opinion, during his younger days in Sept. 26, 2005.
Jim McKnight AP

Every year around the time of pollster Lee Miringoff's birthday, The Marist Institute tries to pin down what "old" means by conducting a poll.

This year, Miringoff turned 62 years old.

NPR's Ina Jaffe filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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3:12pm

Fri May 3, 2013
Shots - Health News

From Battlefield To Boston: Marine Comforts Bombing Survivors

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 11:17 am

Marine Sgt. Maj. Damion Jacobs (left) and Marine Capt. Cam West visit with Boston emergency workers who responded to the bombings at the Boston Marathon.
Oren Dorell for USA Today

2:06pm

Fri May 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Falling In Love Again: Face-Transplant Donor's Daughter Meets Recipient

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

Carmen Blandin Tarleton of Thetford, Vermont, right, is embraced by Marinda Righter, daughter of face donor Cheryl Denelli-Righter, at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass., on Wednesday.
Charles Krupa AP

If there's one conversation you listen to today, make it Melissa Block's talk with Carmen Blandin Tarleton and Marinda Righter.

Tarleton, who was disfigured when her estranged husband poured Lye over her body, received a face transplant in February. This week, for the first time, Tarleton met Righter, the daughter of the face donor.

Righter and Tarleton embraced and then Righter asked Tarleton if she could touch her face.

"It was probably one of the best feelings I've had in my life," Tarleton told Melissa.

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12:53pm

Fri May 3, 2013
Shots - Health News

Urologists Recommend Less PSA Testing For Prostate Cancer

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 11:18 am

Terry Dyroff, of Silver Spring, Md., had a PSA blood test that led to a prostate biopsy. The biopsy found no cancer but did give him a life-threatening infection.
Jose Luis Magana AP

The men and women who often treat prostate cancer are now recommending that the blood test commonly used to screen for it should be given a lot less often.

The American Urological Association released new guidelines that, if they're heeded, would dramatically reduce the ranks of men who would be candidates for PSA testing.

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