Health

1:03pm

Fri March 22, 2013
Shots - Health News

Talk Globally, Go Locally: Cellphones Versus Clean Toilets

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 7:56 am

A young boy plays on a commode during an event for World Toilet Day in New Delhi in November. An estimated 131 million Indian homes don't have a latrine or a clean toilet.
Raveendran AFP/Getty Images

Mobile phones have become ubiquitous across Africa and Asia, but lowly toilets haven't.

Right now, 6 billion people around the world have cellphones. But only 4.5 billion people have access to a clean commode, the United Nations said Thursday.

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8:11am

Fri March 22, 2013
Shots - Health News

How A Sleep Disorder Might Point To A Forgotten Future

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 10:03 am

A towel covers the face of a man in a geriatric day care facility of the German Red Cross at Villa Albrecht in Berlin.
Carsten Koall Getty Images

What you do while you're asleep may say something about your cognitive function later in life.

Here's why. Mayo Clinic researchers report that having a condition called REM sleep behavior disorder, in which you act out dreams in your sleep, appears to be a harbinger for something called Lewy body dementia years later — at least in men.

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7:11am

Fri March 22, 2013
Shots - Health News

How A Patient's Suicide Changed A Doctor's Approach To Guns

Dr. Frank Dumont at his clinic in Estes Park, Colo.
Barry Gutierrez for NPR

Dr. Frank Dumont knew one of his favorite patients was getting depressed.

When Dumont first started seeing him in his family practice, the man was in his 70s. He was active and fit; he enjoyed hiking into his 80s. But then things started to change.

"He started complaining of his memory starting to slip," Dumont says. The man would forget where he had placed objects, and he'd struggle to remember simple words and phrases.

Dumont prescribed antidepressants and saw him every eight weeks or so.

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2:59pm

Thu March 21, 2013
Shots - Health News

Colorado Doctors Treating Gunshot Victims Differ On Gun Politics

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:29 pm

Chris Colwell, director of emergency medicine at Denver Health, has treated victims from two of the deadliest mass shootings in the U.S. He says he's deeply disturbed by how easy it is to get guns.
Barry Gutierrez for NPR

In Colorado, more people die from gunshots than car crashes. And that has a profound effect on the people on the front lines who treat gunshot victims.

Chris Colwell is an emergency room doctor in Denver, and says he sees gun violence victims on a weekly basis. When those cases are fatal, they are hard for him to forget.

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2:29pm

Thu March 21, 2013
Shots - Health News

Tuberculosis Cases In The U.S. Keep Sliding

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 10:02 am

About a third of the world's population is thought to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but only a small fraction of people get the disease.
NIAID_Flickr

The U.S. is slowly but steadily closing in on tuberculosis.

For the first time since the government started tracking the disease in the 1950s, the number of annual TB cases has dropped below 10,000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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