Health

2:44pm

Thu March 7, 2013
Shots - Health News

Shrimp Trawling Comes With Big Risks

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 4:03 pm

John Berthelot, top, and Hosea Wilson, bottom right, release the nets from their shrimp boat, Monday, May 3, 2010, at the Venice Marina in Venice, La.
Eric Gay AP

Think your job is bad? Quit whining, unless you're a shrimper in the Gulf of Mexico.

Commercial fishermen have the highest rate of on-the-job fatalities of any occupation in the country — 116 deaths per 100,000 workers in 2010. A majority of the deaths happen when a fishing vessel sinks. About a third occur when someone goes overboard.

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12:47pm

Thu March 7, 2013
Shots - Health News

To Make Mice Smarter, Add A Few Human Brain Cells

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 4:13 pm

These drawings by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, published in 1899, show cortex neurons.
Santiago Ramon y Cajal Wikimedia Commons

For more than a century, neurons have been the superstars of the brain. Their less glamorous partners, glial cells, can't send electric signals, and so they've been mostly ignored.

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10:25am

Thu March 7, 2013
Shots - Health News

To Save A Life, Odds Favor Defibrillators In Casinos

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 1:22 pm

Main Street Station casino security staffers Jim Daugherty (left) and James Boles show off an automated external defibrillator in Las Vegas in 1997. Back then, the idea of putting the devices in casinos to save lives seemed like a long shot.
Lennox McLendon AP

If someone's heart suddenly stops beating, a quick shock can be a lifesaver.

By the time a person can get to the hospital, though, it's often too late. The chances of survival are best, in fact, if the shock is given within three minutes of a person's collapse.

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2:30pm

Wed March 6, 2013
Shots - Health News

Hear That? In A Din Of Voices, Our Brains Can Tune In To One

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 9:49 am

Scientists say that understanding how the cocktail party effect works could help people who have trouble deciphering sounds in a noisy environment. Guests make it look easy at a Dolce and Gabbana Lounge party in London in 2010.
Paul Jeffers AP

Scientists are beginning to understand how people tune in to a single voice in a crowded, noisy room.

This ability, known as the "cocktail party effect," appears to rely on areas of the brain that have completely filtered out unwanted sounds, researchers report in the journal Neuron. So when a person decides to focus on a particular speaker, other speakers "have no representation in those [brain] areas," says Elana Zion Golumbic of Columbia University.

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10:03am

Wed March 6, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why ER Docs In The Big Apple Won't Replace That Painkiller Prescription

Posters like this one tell patients in New York City emergency rooms what to expect when it comes to painkiller prescriptions.
New York City Health Department

Early this year, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said public hospitals there would take steps to reduce overdoses and abuse of opioid painkillers.

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