Higher Education (College)

2:39pm

Mon July 1, 2013
Planet Money

An MIT Project That Lets You Spy On Yourself

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:54 am

This is my (Gmail) life.
immersion.mit.media.edu

Of all the stuff on metadata I've seen in the past few weeks, this is my favorite:

It's my favorite in large part because it's my metadata. It comes from my Gmail account. The relationships it maps are, more or less, my life — orange circles for Planet Money, purple for Brooklyn, brown for college. The big red circle that gets cut off at the bottom of the screengrab is my mom.

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11:50am

Thu June 27, 2013
The Two-Way

Florida A&M Lifts Suspension Of 'Marching 100' Band

Members of the Marching 100, Florida A&M University's marching band, perform before the Super Bowl in Feb. 2010.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Florida A&M's interim president announced Thursday that he was lifting the suspension of the school's famed "Marching 100" band.

The band had been suspended since November 2011, following the hazing-related death of one of its drum majors.

In a statement, interim President Larry Robinson said the re-institution of the band comes after "sweeping changes" that address hazing.

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9:36am

Mon June 24, 2013
The Two-Way

Supreme Court Sends Affirmative Action Case Back To Lower Court

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:39 pm

Abigail Noel Fisher, who challenged a racial component to University of Texas at Austin's admissions policy, speaks to the media outside the U.S. Supreme Court building during oral in the case in October.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

One of the Supreme Court's most anticipated cases of its current term — a challenge to the University of Texas' affirmative action admissions process — has ended with a ruling that does not revisit the fundamental issue of whether such programs discriminate against whites.

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8:52am

Mon June 24, 2013
Law

Supreme Court Sends Affirmative Action Case Back To Lower Court

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 9:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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6:31am

Sun June 23, 2013
Education

What Happens Without Affirmative Action: The Story Of UCLA

Originally published on Sun June 23, 2013 11:10 am

Students at the University of California, Los Angeles, rally in October to protest claims that race factored into the school's admission decisions.
Neil Bedi The Daily Bruin

The Supreme Court is expected to rule this week on a case that may shake up race-conscious admissions in higher education. The justices could change the shape of affirmative action or even strike it down altogether.

California is one of eight states that have already scrapped affirmative action. That means state schools can no longer consider the race of its applicants. At the University of California, Los Angeles, the change has been messy, ambiguous — and sometimes a little ugly.

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