History

3:46am

Sun June 17, 2012
Around the Nation

States Stake Claim On Sir Francis Drake's Landing

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.
Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Oregon and California are locked in a dispute over something that happened 433 years ago, when Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.

It happened on what is now the American West Coast. The question is where? Oregon or California? The National Park Service is now poised to officially recognize one state's claim.

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10:03pm

Sat June 16, 2012
Theater

The Stage On Which Juliet First Called Out For Romeo

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 1:05 pm

Archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology recently excavated the site of the 16th-century Curtain Theatre, where Shakespeare staged some of his plays.
Museum of London Archaeology AP

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of the Bard's old stomping grounds — ruins of a famous 16th-century theater, buried below the streets of modern London. Known in its heyday as the Curtain Theatre, it's often been eclipsed by its more famous younger sibling, the Globe.

But the Curtain is a big deal in its own right. Some of Shakespeare's most famous works premiered there — Romeo and Juliet and Henry V, just to name a couple. NPR's Rachel Martin talked to the archaeologist who dug up the theater, Chris Thomas of the Museum of London.

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10:15am

Sat June 16, 2012
Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know

Follow The Money: On The Trail Of Watergate Lore

A photograph of the Watergate complex that was used as an exhibit in the trial of G. Gordon Liddy.
National Archives

"Follow the money" – a phrase that's now part of our national lexicon — was supposedly whispered to reporter Bob Woodward by Deep Throat as a way to cut through the lies and deceptions and find the truth about the Watergate scandal. The so-called third-rate burglary that happened 40 years ago this weekend ended the presidency of Richard Nixon. But did Mark Felt, the former associate director of the FBI who admitted to being Deep Throat in 2005, ever really say "follow the money"?

He did not.

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5:48am

Sat June 16, 2012
Science

A Flicker Of Inspiration Brings Cave Drawings To Life

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 12:22 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Before Pixar or Walt Disney, was there Paleolithic Man?

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: The Chauvet prehistoric cave paintings in France have always glimmered with a mystery: why do the depictions of ancient animals seem to show beasts with several heads and multiple limbs? Are the multi-headed creature figures from mythology, folk art, or some kind of lost world?

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4:00am

Sat June 16, 2012
Around the Nation

Even 'The Star-Spangled Banner' Had A First Draft

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 12:22 pm

"The Star-Spangled Banner" handwritten manuscript by Francis Scott Key, 1814.
Special Collections Department Maryland Historical Society

Monday is the 200th anniversary of the start of the War of 1812. Americans may not know much about that war, but they do know a song the war inspired: "The Star-Spangled Banner." The first scratches of those phrases are on display at the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore.

The original quill-and-ink manuscript was written by Francis Scott Key. He wrote the lyrics while being held aboard a British ship. Trying to work out a prisoner release, he watched the bombardment of Fort McHenry — the rocket's red glare, bombs bursting in air.

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