Immigration

12:40pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Politics

How the West Was Won: Region's Role in Election Debated

The University of Denver will host the first presidential debate on Oct. 3rd.
University of Denver
  • Kirk Siegler reporting for All Things Considered

1:38am

Wed September 12, 2012
Law

U.S. Grows An Industrial Complex Along The Border

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

A Border Patrol agent offers water to two men caught after illegally entering the U.S. through the Arizona desert. Roughly 80,000 federal workers have jobs related to immigration enforcement.
Ted Robbins NPR

The United States' southern border bristles with technology and manpower designed to catch illegal immigrants and drug smugglers. Since 1986, the government has spent hundreds of billions of dollars on fences, aircraft, detention centers and agents.

But even as federal budgets shrink and illegal immigration ebbs, experts say that there's no end in sight for the growth of the border-industrial complex.

A Growing Investment On The Border

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5:17am

Fri September 7, 2012
Politics

In Battleground Colorado, Republicans Courting Hispanic Voters

Mitt Romney supporters Eleanor and Frank Carrillo attended a small business forum his campaign sponsored in Lakewood this week.
Photo by Kirk Siegler

In 2008, more than 60% of Colorado’s Hispanic electorate voted for Barack Obama who campaigned on a platform that included an overhaul to the country’s immigration system.

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5:19pm

Wed September 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Judge OKs Part Of Arizona's Immigration Law

A judge in Arizona has ruled that police in that state can enforce part of the immigration law that has been dubbed the "show me your papers" provision.

Here's more from The Associated Press:

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4:11pm

Wed September 5, 2012
It's All Politics

Florida, Colorado Voter Purges Net Few Noncitizens, So Far

Originally published on Wed September 5, 2012 4:53 pm

States using a federal immigration database to purge noncitizens from voter lists are starting to get results, which so far include few illegal voters.

In Florida, which was first to gain access to the database after fighting the federal government in court, an initial run of roughly 2,600 names has turned up "several" violators, according to a spokesman for Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner.

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