India

2:12pm

Tue May 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Gandhi Artifacts Could Fetch Steep Prices At Auction

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 2:13 pm

A picture of Gandhi taken on July 24, 1931 in New Delhi.
AFP/Getty Images

Artifacts that once belonged to Mohandas K. Gandhi, the Indian independence leader who took a vow of poverty, could fetch hundreds of thousands of dollars at auction.

Read more
Tags: 

5:28am

Tue May 21, 2013
World

Now's Your Chance To Own A Little Bit Of Gandhi

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 9:13 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Today is your chance to own a little bit of Gandhi. The quirky, unpredictable and ultimately triumphant leader spent decades leading India to independence. Along the way, Mohandis Gandhi became known as Mahatma, or venerated one, and he had an appendectomy. Afterward, doctors took samples of his blood. Two microscope slides bearing that blood are being auctioned today in London with bids expected over $15,000.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Tags: 

12:33pm

Fri May 17, 2013
The Two-Way

Mother Of India Gang-Rape Victim Faces Suspects In Court

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 12:31 am

In India, the mother of the 23-year-old woman fatally gang-raped on a moving bus last December appeared in court Friday and for the first time put eyes on the men accused in the heinous attack on her daughter.

The four men on trial have been charged with murder and face capital punishment for the crime that convulsed the country and prompted harsher punishments for rape.

Read more
Tags: 

1:00pm

Wed May 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Publisher Threatens Librarian With $1 Billion Lawsuit

A scholarly publisher has issued a warning to Jeffrey Beall, a librarian who writes about what he calls "predatory" practices in the scholarly publishing industry, threatening him with a $1 billion lawsuit for his blog posts criticizing the company.

Beall is an academic librarian at the University of Colorado; he writes about the journal industry on his personal blog, Scholarly Open Access.

Read more

12:54am

Thu May 9, 2013
Movie Interviews

An Epic Of India Gets A Canvas Its Own Size

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 4:54 am

Parvati and Saleem (Shriya Saran and Satya Bhabha), born in tandem at the birth of independent India, are at the center of Salman Rushdie's novel Midnight's Children. Thirty years after the book's publication, filmmaker Deepa Mehta has committed the story to the big screen.
108 Media

In the 1970s, Salman Rushdie was an unknown writer living in London. He decided to return to the country of his birth and rough it across India on what he describes as "extraordinarily long 15-hour bus rides with chickens vomiting on our feet."

That trip inspired Midnight's Children, the Booker Prize-winning novel that many consider Rushdie's literary masterpiece. Now, more than 30 years after it was published, Midnight's Children arrives on the big screen in a glittering film adaptation from Oscar-nominated director Deepa Mehta.

Read more

Pages