Insects

5:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Health

Emerging Virus Chikungunya Under Scrutiny By Fort Collins CDC Lab

A CDC scientist examines mosquitoes using a stereoscopic microscope to identify the species while working in a BSL-3 lab in Fort Collins, Colorado
Centers for Disease Control Division of Vector Borne Diseases

While most Americans probably haven't heard of Chikungunya, Ann Powers, a research microbiologist at the Centers for Disease Control, has been studying the virus for 15 years.

The mosquito-carried virus made the news recently when the first locally-transmitted case of it appeared in Florida, July 17. Now, the public and medical researchers are wondering if it may spread further into the United States, and how serious it might be.

The research that Powers does at the CDC's Division of Vector Borne Diseases in Fort Collins may help answer some of those questions.

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1:47pm

Tue June 17, 2014

6:00am

Sat June 14, 2014
The Garden Report

To Repel Insect Pests, Consider These Plants

Studies show that catnip rivals Deet as a mosquito repellent.
Credit Claudia Daggett / Flickr - Creative Commons

Anywhere there is standing water, mosquitoes will thrive. While chemical repellents are big business, there is a natural alternative. The scent of several plant species help to keep mosquitoes away. 

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6:23am

Tue June 10, 2014
Science

Spiders Tune In To Web's Music To Size Up Meals And Mates

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 3:03 pm

Hairlike sensors on the the legs of the golden silk spider help it "listen" to the thrum of its web.
I'll Never Grow Up Flickr

Some of the toughest stuff in nature is spider silk — as strong, ounce for ounce, as nylon. And a silk web makes a great trap for prey, as well as a nice place for a spider to live.

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5:00am

Mon May 26, 2014
Environment

Is Corn Dust Killing Bees?

Farmer Nathan Anderson wears beekeeping gear to protect himself when he opens or closes the pollen traps on bee hives on his farm. He has allowed researchers to place three pairs of hives on his fields.
Credit Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Nathan Anderson stops his red pick-up truck alongside a cornfield on his farm near Cherokee, Iowa. The young farmer pulls on a heavy brown hoodie, thick, long, sturdy gloves and a beekeeper’s hat with a screened veil. He approaches a pair of hives sitting on the edge of a field recently planted with corn and adjusts a yellow plastic flap that traps some of the pollen the bees bring back to their hive.

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