Insects

1:24pm

Tue September 3, 2013
Environment

Western Bumblebees May Be Poised For A Colorado Comeback

born1945 Creative Commons

Western bumblebee populations have decreased dramatically in recent years in states like Oregon, Washington and Colorado – making them increasingly rare in the west. They just might be on the verge of a comeback.

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3:52pm

Mon August 19, 2013
Shots - Health News

Lyme Disease Far More Common Than Previously Known

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:58 pm

Black-legged ticks like this can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 300,000 Americans are getting Lyme disease every year, and the toll is growing.

"It confirms what we've thought for a long time: This is a large problem," Dr. Paul Mead tells Shots. "The bottom line is that by defining how big the problem is we make it easier for everyone to figure out what kind of resources we have to use to address it."

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8:49am

Tue August 13, 2013
The Salt

Why Urban Beekeeping Can Be Bad For Bees

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:27 pm

Beehive designer Johannes Paul (right) and Natural England's ecologist Peter Massini, with a brood frame colonized with bees from the "beehaus" beehive on the roof of his house in London in 2009.
Sang Tan AP

Two British scientists are dumping cold water on campaigns to promote urban beekeeping. They say that trying to "help the bees" by setting out more hives is naive and misguided if the bees can't find enough flowers nearby to feed on. You'll just end up with sick and starving bees.

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2:42pm

Mon August 12, 2013
Environment

Increased West Nile Spraying In Northern Colorado

Credit dr_relling / Flickr

The number of human cases of West Nile in Colorado has reached 17 so far this season, prompting more municipalities to spray for mosquitoes.

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1:03am

Thu August 1, 2013
Animals

Jack Longino, 'The Astonishing Ant Man,' Finds 33 New Species

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 4:01 pm

A side view of the new ant species Eurhopalothrix zipacna. Mounting glue and paper appear beneath the ant, one of 33 new species discovered in Central America by Jack Longino, a biologist at the University of Utah.
John T. Longino University of Utah

While many of us spend our working days staring into an electronic box or dozing at meetings, there are some who prefer to crawl through tropical rain forests. People like "the astonishing ant man."

That's what his students call Jack Longino. Longino started out collecting stamps in his childhood, but that got boring fast. Man-made things just didn't thrill, so Longino decided to "get small."

As in: "If you're shopping for a home entertainment system," he says, "you can't do better than a good dissecting microscope."

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