Japan

1:39pm

Wed April 11, 2012
The Salt

Fishermen Net Gold In Silvery Eels Sold To Asia

A fisherman uses a lantern while dip-netting for elvers on a river in southern Maine. Elvers are young, translucent eels that are born in the Sargasso Sea and swim to freshwater lakes and ponds, where they grow to adults before returning to the sea.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

There's a gold rush under way on the East Coast of the U.S. for tiny baby eels known as elvers. Fishermen in Maine and South Carolina are reaping profits upward of $2,000 per pound for the fish that are considered a delicacy in Japan.

Elvers have an almost ghostly appearance in the water — their bodies are a cloudy white, skinny as a cocktail straw and no longer than your finger. They look like tiny snakes as they squiggle through the water.

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9:32am

Tue April 10, 2012
The Salt

More, Better, Faster Sushi? Call In A 'Sushi Bot'

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 6:39 pm

Suzbo sushi roller.
Youtube.com

Wired reports that "sushi bots" were among the eye-catching products at the World Food and Beverage Great Expo, which just wrapped up in Tokyo.

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7:35am

Fri April 6, 2012

6:10am

Fri April 6, 2012

10:01pm

Tue March 27, 2012
Movies

In Japan, 'Sliced-Up Actors' Are A Dying Breed

Fukumoto in one of the numerous period costume dramas he has acted in for the Toei Company's film studios since he began work there in 1959.
Toei Kyoto Studio Park

Japan is home to Asia's oldest and largest motion-picture industry, with its own unique genres and traditions. While every film industry has stuntmen, only Japan has a class of actors whose main job is to be sliced and diced by samurai sword-wielding protagonists. But the decline of period dramas means that this class of actors is literally a dying breed.

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