K-12 Education

6:28am

Mon June 30, 2014
NPR Ed

Is Latin Making A Comeback In Schools? Caveat Lector

Latin has now been "coming back" in schools for more than half a century.
iStockphoto

Look no further than Hollywood this summer to know that new ideas are often just old ones that have been dragged out of the past and dressed up to look fresh.

It happens in journalism too, and education journalism is no exception. Having covered this stuff for a long time now, I'm regularly coming across old stories that simply refuse to die.

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2:15pm

Wed June 25, 2014
NPR Ed

Giving Boys A Bigger Emotional Toolbox

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 1:38 pm

Ashanti Branch, an assistant principal at Montera Middle School in Oakland, Calif., leads boys in a "check in" circle at his after-school Ever Forward Club.
Eric Westervelt NPR

This story is part of the "Men In America" series on All Things Considered.

Is America's dominant "man up" ethos a hypermasculine cultural construct, a tenet rooted in biological gender difference or something in between?

Educator Ashanti Branch doesn't much care or, more accurately, doesn't have time to care.

He's too busy trying to make a difference in boys' lives.

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12:03pm

Wed June 25, 2014
NPR Ed

What Kids Can Learn From A Water Balloon Fight

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 7:30 pm

10:05am

Tue June 24, 2014
NPR Ed

New Approaches To Discipline Strive To Keep Kids Out Of Jail

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

A jury of 9th-graders is sworn in at a "teen court" session in Michigan.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

School's out for the summer. For young people in New York City, if last summer was any guide, that may mean they're less likely to be arrested.

The connection between young people, especially poor boys of color, getting into trouble in school and getting into trouble with the law is known as the "school-to-prison pipeline."

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6:03am

Fri June 20, 2014
NPR Ed

The Politics Of The Common Core

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 9:08 am

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announces his plan to remove Louisiana from tests associated with the Common Core.
Melinda Deslatte AP

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal said Wednesday that he wants to cut ties with the Common Core State Standards, the benchmarks in reading and math that he helped bring to the state four years ago, and replace them with new, Louisiana-specific standards.

"We won't let the federal government take over Louisiana's education standards," Jindal said in a statement. "We're very alarmed about choice and local control over curriculum being taken away from parents and educators."

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