Kenya

5:30am

Mon July 22, 2013
Crime In The City

In Nairobi, A Maasai Detective Pursues Elusive Justice

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:48 am

Crompton's novel begins in Nairobi's Uhuru Park.
Sayyid Azim AP

If not for his earlobes, Detective Mollel would cut a classic figure of the crime fiction genre: moody, obsessive and a widower estranged from his son. But Mollel is a Kenyan from the Maasai tribe and the flesh of his earlobes is long and looped, stretched since childhood to hang below his jawline.

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3:16pm

Sat July 13, 2013
Author Interviews

Searching For Clues In A Dangerous Nairobi

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 4:39 pm

In a new work of crime fiction from author Mukoma Wa Ngugi you still have the detective and his buddy, the mysterious body that turns up at the outset, and the crazy bar where the cops and criminals hang out together. Only this time, we're not in Scandinavia, or South Florida or on Mystic River. We're in a Nairobi beset with political violence, hotel bombings and ethnic warfare.

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4:01pm

Fri June 28, 2013
Planet Money

Episode 469: Rhino Horns And Clean Water

Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images, Jacob Goldstein/NPR

On today's show: Two stories from Kenya.

1. Can Economics Save The African Rhino? Poachers kill rhinos for their horns. Some economists think legalizing the horns could save the rhinos.

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1:03am

Thu June 20, 2013
Planet Money

A Surprising Barrier To Clean Water: Human Nature

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 8:38 am

Rodan Gatia gets water from a spring. A chlorine dispenser is behind her.
Jacob Goldstein NPR

In many parts of the developing world, drinking a glass of water can be deadly — especially for young children, who can die of diarrheal diseases contracted from dirty water.

So getting clean water to people in the developing world has been a top priority for aid groups for a long time. But it's been a surprisingly hard problem to solve.

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2:19pm

Sun June 9, 2013
World

Britain Apologizes For Colonial-Era Torture Of Kenyan Rebels

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:36 pm

Mau Mau leader Gitu wa Kahengeri, right, poses with British High Commissioner to Kenya Christian Turner at the end of a news conference announcing the settlement last week.
Ben Curtis AP

A 60-year-old wound in Kenya has finally found its recompense.

Last week, the British government finalized an out-of-court settlement with thousands of Kenyans who were tortured in detention camps during the end of the British colonial reign. The historic apology — and the unprecedented settlement — has been years in the making.

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