Latin America

2:23pm

Tue September 25, 2012
Latin America

Bolivia's Cerro Rico: The Mountain That Eats Men

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 5:39 pm

Cerro Rico, or Rich Mountain, rises like a monument in Potosi, Bolivia. It has produced silver, and hardship, for centuries. Now it may be in danger of collapse.
Carlos Villalon for NPR

Near the mountain city of Potosi in the southern highlands of Bolivia, the cone-shaped peak of Cerro Rico stands as a 15,800-foot monument to the tragedies of Spanish conquest. For centuries, Indian slaves mined the mountain's silver in brutal conditions to bankroll the Spanish empire.

Today, the descendants of those slaves run the mines. But hundreds of years of mining have left the mountain porous and unstable, and experts say it is in danger of collapsing.

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4:03am

Sat September 8, 2012
Latin America

Plan For Cuban Ballet School A Dance Of Art, Politics

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 7:39 pm

Cuban ballet dancer Carlos Acosta has a bold plan to transform a long-abandoned, incompletely built ballet school in Havana into a global cultural and dance center. But some fear the plan is a step toward "privatization."
Nick Miroff for NPR

A radical proposal to restore one of Cuba's most important architectural landmarks is rekindling a 50-year-old controversy. At the center is ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, who left the island and went on to a lead role in London's Royal Ballet. Acosta wants to return to the island and restore an abandoned ballet school with help from one of the world's most famous architects.

But the proposal has opened old wounds from the school's past and stirred a debate about the future of Cuba's state-sponsored cultural model.

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8:31am

Thu September 6, 2012
Latin America

Guess Who's Chopping Down The Amazon Now?

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 6:20 pm

Loggers discuss the day's plan in a camp called Puesto Viejo, or "old post."
Carlos Villalon for NPR

Though Brazil's Amazon has been the focus of environmental groups for decades, the deforestation rate there has fallen dramatically in recent years as clear-cutting of Amazonian jungle in eight other countries has started to rise.

As a result, the 40 percent of Amazonia located in a moon-shaped arc of countries from Bolivia to Colombia to French Guiana faces a more serious threat than the jungle in Brazil. The culprits range from ranching to soybean farming, logging to infrastructure development projects.

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9:13am

Wed September 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Earthquake Triggers Pacific Tsunami Warnings For Central & South America

Originally published on Wed September 5, 2012 12:48 pm

The star marks the epicenter of today's earthquake in Costa Rica.
U.S. Geological Survey

The Pacific coasts of Costa Rica, Panama and Nicaragua are no longer the focus of tsunami warnings, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center announced just after 1 p.m ET.

As we've been reporting, there was a strong — 7.6 magnitude — earthquake in Costa Rica this morning. At first, there were concerns about possible tsunamis from Mexico south to Chile. As the day continued, however, authorities gradually reduced their warnings.

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6:03am

Tue August 21, 2012
Planet Money

100 Years Of Immigrants In America, In Two Graphs

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 9:32 am

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Immigrants make up roughly the same share of the U.S. population today as they did a century ago.

But changes in the global economy, and in U.S. immigration law, have dramatically shifted where U.S. immigrants are coming from.

A century ago, U.S. immigrants were overwhelmingly European. Today, Latin America and Asia are the big drivers of U.S. immigration, and Europe accounts for just a small fraction of the whole.

Correction: A previous version of the first graphic displayed an incorrect number for 1960.

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